transport

Brazil: How things have (and haven't) changed

From the management of June 2013 uprising to Bolsonaro’s ordered revolt.

Striking the Gig: Why Uber and Lyft Drivers Are Calling For a National Strike on May 8th

On May 8th, workers are organizing a national single day strike against rideshare firms like Uber and Lyft. They’re calling on app users to join them by refusing to request rides for the duration of the 24 hour action.
Salvo investigates what set the stage for this clash, how gig workers in precarious states of employment are organizing, and how we all may soon be in a similar position to them.

Amazon: A new business model better able to manage the contradictions of the capitalist mode of production

Amazon cardboard robot

An attempt to understand the functioning of one the world's most powerful companies using marxist categories - explaining how Amazon manages to combine the functions of productive, comercial and finance capital. The intention is, of course, to try to work out the implications for class strugle...

Anarchy #044

Issue of Anarchy magazine from October 1964, the articles in this issue are mostly about transportation and urban planning.

Signs of the times / Images from the future: Thoughts on the “yellow vests” and the revolt in France - Void Network

Almost two months after their emergence the yellow vests are still here! The movement started attracting international attention and more extensive coverage after the events that took place on Saturday 1/12. This was expectable, since no matter what our political judgment may turn out to be, we are faced with a nationwide revolt, which has not simply prompted thoughts for a state of emergency, but led to its informal implementation, through the extensive police measures imposed during the 8/12 demonstrations.

Brazil: popular revolt and its limits

Vitória 2011 bus fare protests

June 2018 marks five years since the wave of protests against the price of collective transportation, which shook the streets of hundreds of brazilian cities in 2013. At the heart of those riots was the Movimento Passe Livre (something like Free Pass Movement), an autonomous and horizontal social movement founded in 2005, which defended the gratuity of transport. Written in 2014 by two militants who later left the organization, this article reflects on the limits of that cycle of protests.