Tanzania

The post-war strike wave in East, West, and Southern Africa

From the end of the Second World War until the mid-'60s there was a wave of strikes in British East and West Africa, French West Africa, South Africa and Zimbabwe. The history of this class struggle has been neglected by both mainstream historians and most revolutionary tendencies based in Europe and the US.

Reflections on Pan-Africanism

Transcript of speech given on November 20, 1973. James discusses George Padmore's break with the USSR, Jomo Kenyatta, Kwame Nkrumah, Julius Nyerere and other figures.

Mwalimu Nyerere and the challenge of human rights

Nyerere

Article from Pambuzuka which examines Nyerere's record on human rights. While the article is generally pro-Nyerere it details some of the contradictions of Tanzania's post-colonial record, particularly the maintenance of pre-colonial Penal and deportation codes.

The 1948 Zanzibar General Strike

A history of the three week general strike in Zanzibar, 1948.

The Rise and Fall and Insurrection of Trade Unionism in Tanzania

Chachage Seithy L. Chachage

An overview of the development of trade unions in Tanzania between the 1920s and 1990s by Tanzanian sociologist Chachage Seithy L. Chachage.

The East African Railway Strike, 1959-60: labour’s challenge of inter-territorialism

David Hyde examines a pivotal working-class struggle which erupted within East Africa’s transport system near the end of the colonial period. Though this was arguably the most important working-class struggle to occur during the decolonisation process within Britain’s African colonies, it has been rarely acknowledged and barely attended to.

1948: Zanzibar City General Strike

In 1948 dock workers in Zanzibar struck for higher pay, the use of force by the British Colonial authorities lead to other workers coming out in sympathy making the strike a general one.

Security guards murder locals scavenging for gold in Papua New Guinea

Private security guards employed by ‘Barrick Gold’, aided by local police have killed at least five miners at the Porgera mine in Papua New Guinea. The shootings came after mine security confronted a group of 300 locals who they deemed to be ‘illegal miners’ and ‘trespassers’. Barrick Gold – the world’s largest producer of gold - has a long history of using violence, gang rape, and murder against their workers, and local people in Papua New Guinea. Barrick founder and owner, Peter Munk, claimed that ‘gang rape’ is just a ‘cultural habit’.

Tanzania miners: digging their own graves

A new report into the mining industry in Tanzania has exposed endemic corruption, displacement of the poor, environmental destruction and deteriorating working conditions in the poverty-stricken country as international corporations clean up.

Julius Nyerere, African socialist

Kevin Anderson of the Marxist Humanist tendency discusses Tanzanian President Julius Nyerere, shortly after his death.