surveillance

The untold history of armistice and the end of World War I

‘The best antidote to ideology is detail,’ writes Paul Mason. And the detail that’s missing this Armistice Day is that working people, when they take power into their own hands, can end whatever catastrophe is imposed on them.

DSEI: A supermarket for state surveillance and border wars

As borders are increasingly militarised and their operation privatised, migration, more than ever before, is also an anti-militarist struggle, write Amy Hall and Sara Woods of Shoal Collective.

The CIA reads French theory: on the intellectual labor of dismantling the cultural Left - Gabriel Rockhill

Notwithstanding its limitations, an interesting historical look at the state's utilisation of academia and the cultural sphere in the struggle to discredit Marxism. First published 28/02/17 in 'The Philosophical Salon' of the 'LA Review of Books'.

1984: George Orwell

Romano de George Orwell pri mondo regas unu partion. Dikaturo de la partio nepre dominas ĉia de penson kaj agon.

We ain't scurred: state harassment won't stop movement against police brutality - Twin Cities GDC

A statement by the Twin Cities General Defense Committee (GDC) of the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) about a recent incident of state harassment.

What every radical should know about state repression - Victor Serge

Victor Serge's exposé of the surveillance methods used by the Czarist police reads like a spy thriller.

New evidence shows U.S. government spied on Wobblies, activists

An article by Brendan Maslauskas Dunn about military infiltration of an anti-war group around the Port of Olympia.

Next stop 1984: computers, identification cards and immigration control

Article written for Zerowork issue 3 about new technologies available to states to control migration and the working class.

Cities under siege: the new urban militarism - Stephen Graham

Psychogeographical look at the ever increasing encroachment of militarism and high tech surveillance into urban areas.

1984 - George Orwell

A world with constant surveillance, perpetual war and a militarised police state, George Orwell's most famous novel was a warning against totalitarian governments, all the more relevant now then when it was written.