protests

Global Protests: The Relentless Capitalist Crisis Demands the Overthrow of the System

How to make sense of these mushrooming mass protests-cum-rebellions which have no clear class character, owe their lightening speed of organisation largely to the rallying capacity of social media, which have few distinct or established leaders and whose often contradictory demands are constantly changing and are now emulating each other?

1997-1998: AIDS activists (ACT UP) demand federal funding for needle exchange programs

During the takeover, activists chained and barricaded themselves inside Thurman'

Account of the 18 month long protests to overturn government bans on clean needle exchanges which contributed to the spread of diseases and thousands of deaths per year.

1994-5: ACT UP activists resist New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani’s AIDS policies

Account of the year long struggles to save social services and support for AIDs patients from budget cuts.

1970-71: Australian Opposition to Consription and Involvement in the Vietnam War

Account of the largest protests in Australian history, with protestors demanding an end to conscription and Australian involvement in the war in Vietnam

1974: The Brockwell 3

Account of student protests against the assault and arrest of three Black youths in 1970s Brixton.

1918: Ireland's Anti-Conscription Campaign

Account of the opposition movement to the imposition of conscription on Ireland by the British Government during the First World War.

Sudan: The Dictator Goes but the Regime Lives On

Since December last year Sudan has been seething but it now looks like the Army have reasserted control. What started as bread riots last December, in the historic working class city of Atbara, transformed itself into a campaign of mass civil disobedience.

An Open Letter to my Compatriots in Algeria

Seeking to erode Algerian-Moroccan enmities stoked by nationalism and to share perspectives on his own experiences in the February 20th Movement in Morocco, a Moroccan filmmaker addresses Algerians who have taken to the streets starting on February 22, 2019 in a plea against authoritarianism.

The Crisis of the Sudanese Regime

It was the tripling of bread prices which sparked off the current revolt in Sudan. People first took to the streets in the town of Atbara in north eastern Sudan on 19 December 2018, but they did not restrict their demands to bread even though some had not managed to find any in four days. They had had enough of the brutal military dictatorship of Omar Hassan al-Bashir which has ruled the country since 1989. The protestors not only demanded “freedom, peace, and justice” but also echoed the slogan of the 2011 Arab Spring that “the people want the fall of the regime.” As a symbol of their wider political demands, the ruling party headquarters in Atbara was burned to the ground.

Against Pension “Reform" in Russia

Statement about recent pension reform in Russia written by the Krasnoyarsk Marxist Workers’ Group.