newspapers

The Truth about “The Truth about Today’s Anarchists”

A response to a New York Times article that repeated conspiracy theories about anarchists manipulating the Black Lives Matter movement. This article was originally published by Crimethinc.

“בעגריסונג צום „קלאַסען קאַמף

“אַ בריוו פֿון מ. קאַטץ וואָס אײַנפֿירן דער „קלאַסען קאַמף

Welcome to the "Class Struggle"

Letter from M. Kattz to introduce the Class Struggle newspaper.

Black Flag 161 (22-9-1986)

Covering a Norwegian invasion of Thatcher's getaway castle, the rise of fascism within Spanish skinhead culture, an expose on a Nazi-linked landlord, plus international stories on Chile and South Africa, industrial news and reviews.

The Commoner #15: Care Work and the Commons

The Commoner Banner #15

Issue 15 of The Commoner magazine

The Freelance Journalists Union Goes Public

The Industrial Workers of the World has just launched a new organisation for workers in the Journalism sector.

A beautiful idea: history of the Freedom Press anarchists by Rob Ray [Book review]

A beautiful idea: history of the Freedom Press anarchists by Rob Ray.

A review of Rob Ray's 2018 history of Freedom Press taken from KSL: the Bulletin of the Kate Sharpley Library

Yiddish radicalism, Jewish religion: Controversies in the Fraye Arbeter Shtime, 1937–1945

Lilian Türk & Jesse Cohn's joint essay examining the debates over religion hosted in the Yiddish anarchist newspaper Fraye Arbeter Shtime.

A Victim of Power (Corp) and Police: The La Presse Conflict and the Tear Gas Suffocation of Michele Gauthier

A report on the 1971 conflict at La Presse and the police killing of socialist feminist Michele Gauthier. The broader struggle against Power Corp., the impact of the police killing, and the development of the Common Front and subsequent general strikes.

“Radical Gotham” – New York City, Just Like You Pictured It

Radical Gotham: Anarchism in New York City

Review of Tom Goyens, ed., Radical Gotham: Anarchism in New York City (2017). Describes the essays on 19th-20th century anarchist groups at first by ethnicity and the newspapers they produced in NYC – Johann Most and the Germans; Saul Yanovsky and the Jews; Luigi Galleani and his Italian followers; and the Spanish circle around El Despertar. Also a chapter on Dorothy Day and the Catholic Worker. Post-WWII, the essays discuss the Why? group of post-WWII anarchists; the Living Theatre; Black Mask/Up Against the Wall Motherfuckers; the artist Gordon Matta-Clark; the ABC No Rio cultural center; and finally anarchism in Occupy Wall Street.