matamoros

Interview on the strike wave in Mexico

SITUAM workers march in Mexico City, 2019 | Image courtesy Patrick Cuninghame

Ray Valentine interviews Patrick Cuninghame, a History and Sociology lecturer at the Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana (UAM) in Mexico City, about the strike wave in Mexico this year. The strikes started in Matamoros, among workers in maquiladoras (assembly plants), and later spread to seven universities, including UAM. This interview was first published on the Organizing Work blog.

New trade union bureaucracies or rank-and-file workers’ power? Lessons of the Matamoros workers’ rebellion: Part one

Striking workers in matamoros

Two months after workers launched wildcat strikes in the Mexican city of Matamoros, 89 “maquiladora” factories, mostly in the auto parts, electric, and metallurgical industries, have agreed to workers’ demands for a 20 percent raise and a bonus of 32,000 pesos (US$1,655)—half of the average yearly salary. The strike wave has become known across Mexico as the “20/32 movement.”

Mexico: Metalworkers, universities join strike wave as 90,000 Walmart workers threaten to walk out

Dozens of maquiladora plants that agreed to the “20-32”—a 20 percent raise and a bonus of 32,000 pesos (US$1,700)—demanded by workers in Matamoros, Mexico, are escalating their reprisals against the historic wave of strikes that began in the city on January 12. This has included thousands of firings.