Marxism

Marx on the Russian Mir, and misconceptions by Marxists

Marx's 1877 letter to the editor of Otecestvenniye Zapisky refuting the idea that all societies would transition from feudalism to capitalism before communism.

The revolutionary program of communist society eliminates all forms of ownership of land, the instruments of production and the products of labor - Partito Comunista Internazionale

In this 1957 text drafted for the Partito Comunista Internazionale, Amadeo Bordiga, with his usual acerbic wit, restates some of the “invariant” principles of Marxism, denounces the idea that communism means collective or individual “property” or “ownership”—terms he subjects to historical analysis as transitory juridical forms—argues in favor of social usufruct as the concept most adequate for the future classless society, ridicules the “metaphysical and idealist” error of the “immediatists” who hold that “socialism is a struggle for the individual liberation of the worker” and, just to rub it in, condemns drinkers and smokers as “usufructuary traitors” against the health of the species.

The Marxist ideology in Russia - Karl Korsch

Karl Korsch

In this text from 1938, Karl Korsch puts forward the notion that Marxism in Russia effectively served as the ideological cloak of capitalist development, but that this was in fact anticipated by theoretical concessions, made by Marx and Engels in the 1870s/1880s, to the ideas held by the Russian populists, the Narodniki.

Bordiga and the passion for communism – Jacques Camatte

Jacques Camatte’s 1972 essay on Amadeo Bordiga, discussing the Italian Marxist’s notorious “invariance”, his “hermeneutics” of “the precise connection between the proletariat and theory”, his “prophetic vision” of the communist future, his identification of the party with the class, his disdain for the cult of personality, his “anti-gradualism”, the impact of the publication of the Grundrisse and the Economic Manuscripts of 1844 on his thought, his precocious environmentalism, his anti-individualism, and his failure to recognize the significance of May ’68, pointing out that despite all his contradictions and limitations “his works are full of starting points for new research”.

“On Authority” Revisited

Fredrick Engels argues against Anarchism on the basis that authority is needed to carry out a revolution against capitalism and the organization of society. This article argues that he fundamentally ignored what Anarchists actually meant when they said they were against authority.

Karl Marx and the Future of the Human - Cyril Smith

This is the full text, in PDF format, of Cyril Smith's "Karl Marx and the Future of the Human".

Excerpt from Marx's review of the Reichstag debate, 1878

English translation of an excerpt from Marx's review of the Reichstag debate. The review is based on reports made and sent by Wilhelm Bracke.

Daniel Guerin and Libertarian Communism

An article by Katya Pavlichenko on Daniel Guerin's ideas on the synthesis between Marxism and anarchism.

Divide and conquer or divide and subdivide? How not to refight the First International – Mark Leier

A pamphlet by labour historian Mark Leier (author of Bakunin: The Creative Passion) which looks at the similarities and differences of the two leading figures of the First International, Mikhail Bakunin and Karl Marx. Leier suggests that the differences are often exaggerated by anarchists and Marxists alike, and that revolutionaries today can learn a great deal from both figures' strengths and weaknesses.

The dictatorship of the proletariat - Joseph Weydemeyer

Article on proletarian dictatorship first published in 'Turn-Zeitung', New York, January 1st 1852. Written by Joseph Weydemeyer (1818-1866), a Prussian military officer and socialist who emigrated to the US after his participation in the failed revolution of 1848. In the US he was active in the early, American workers' movement, was a proponent of abolitionism and racial equality, and became a lieutenant colonel in the Union army during the Civil War.