indigenous

The Cherokee Removal Through the Eyes of a Private Soldier

In May 1838, federal militias started to round up Cherokees and move them into stockades in several southern states. They were then forced to march one thousand miles westward. Thousands of Cherokees died as a result of the removal. The journey became known as "The Trail of Tears" or "The Trail Where They Cried." Fifty years later, in 1890, Private John Burnett, who served in the mounted infantry; told his children his memories of the Trail of Tears1, which he described as the "execution of the most brutal order in the History of American Warfare."

From Voices of A People's History, edited by Zinn and Arnove

The making of an interethnic coalition: urban and rural anarchists in La Paz, Bolivia, 1946–1947

Anarchist rally in La Paz, 1930.

Kevin A. Young's account of the interethnic alliance between urban anarchists and indigenous peasants which facilitated the 1947 upheavals surrounding La Paz, Bolivia.

Revolution in Central America- Daniel Fogel

FMLN Guerrillas

A contemporary and critical account of the 20th century history of Central America, in particular the conflicts between Leftist rebels and US backed right wing dictatorships in Nicaragua, El Salvador, and Guatemala.

Christmas day freedom fighters: hidden history of the Seminole anticolonial struggle - William Katz

On Christmas day in 1837, the Africans and Native Americans who formed Florida’s Seminole Nation defeated a vastly superior U.S. invading army bent on cracking this early rainbow coalition and returning the Africans to slavery.

Paranoia and terror as models of governance – Alèssi Dell’Umbria

A 2011 essay on Mexico’s descent into chaos under the blows of NAFTA and the “drug war”, whose purpose is not only to transform northern Mexico into a security zone for the U.S., but also to hasten “primitive accumulation” (driving peasants off their land—which is then handed over to agribusiness or extraction industries—and into the “colonias” where they will be prey to the drug war and intensive police and military repression) by destroying the surviving communal social forms in “a war against society” that is traumatizing the population but also generating a largely indigenous, assembly-based autonomous movement that is forming militias to defend its communities (e.g., Chiapas).

Aléssi dell’Umbria’s Istmeño—The Winds of Revolt: a documentary film about resistance against dispossession – Argelaga

A review of the 2015 documentary film about the resistance struggle against the construction of gigantic arrays of industrial wind turbines to generate “clean” energy in Oaxaca (southern Mexico), discussing the resistance movement’s historical background in Mexico’s precipitous descent into the nightmare of the accelerated expropriation of the agrarian population by the economic impact of NAFTA since 1994 and the “police-military narco-state violence” that has been used as a convenient screen for repression and elimination of dissidents, as the country is integrated into the world market and its resources are further opened to foreign exploitation.

The Ideology of Progress in Latin America – Revista Argelaga

An essay “written on the occasion of the premier of the documentary film, ‘Asfaltar Bolivia’” [Paving Bolivia] in Barcelona (2015), denouncing the destructive impact of capitalist development and its hypocritical rhetoric of “progress”, “development” and “modernization”, in the context of the recent nationalist upsurge based on extractive industries and a modified form of globalization that has swept over Latin America as the new populist leaders attempt to impose “modern, consumerist, individualist and predatory lifestyles” to create a “social base” so the “extractivist bureaucracy can consolidate its power” at the expense of indigenous communities and “collective ways of life”.

The vivisection of oikeios: beyond the binary of nature and society

A felled tree

The common-sense distinction between nature and society was established through the bloody history of capitalist and colonial development, which brought about a real separation between the social and natural worlds.

The New Brazil - Raúl Zibechi: reviewed by Levi Gahman

Brazil is now the poster child for neoliberal capitalism. Within its borders, vast inequities in wealth and access to social services still exist - in his latest work, Raúl Zibechi explains how and why this is the case...

The battle of the Little Bighorn, narrated by an Indian who fought in it

An account of the battle of Little Big Horn by Two Moon a Cheyenne chief who took part in it.