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Freedom Press

Workers in Stalin's Russia - Marie Louise Berneri

A short book written in 1944. Berneri outlines how socialism did not exist in the U.S.S.R. and how the lives of workers under state socialism was essentially the same as those who lived under capitalist democracies.

The Fighting-call. Vol. 1, no. 4

The fourth edition of Fighting-call, a journal of the Freedom Group and Anti-Parliamentary Communist Federation, from February 1937.

The Fighting-call. Vol. 1, no. 3

The third edition of Fighting-call, a journal of the Freedom Group and Anti-Parliamentary Communist Federation, from December 1936.

The Fighting-call. Vol. 1, no. 1

The first edition of Fighting-call, a journal of the Freedom Group and Anti-Parliamentary Communist Federation, from October 1936.

The Jamaican Emigrants - Freedom Press

A contemporary Freedom Press editorial from June 26th, 1948 on Jamaican 'Windrush' immigrants and British emigrants.

A beautiful idea: history of the Freedom Press anarchists by Rob Ray [Book review]

A beautiful idea: history of the Freedom Press anarchists by Rob Ray.

A review of Rob Ray's 2018 history of Freedom Press taken from KSL: the Bulletin of the Kate Sharpley Library

Spanish anti-fascist ‘prisoners of war’ in Lancashire, 1944–46

Spanish anti-fascist prisoners in Chorley

Fascinating and detailed paper by Richard Cleminson examining the appalling treatment of Spanish anti-fascist resistance fighters during World War II being detained in internment camps in Britain alongside Nazi and fascist prisoners.

Anarchist tactic for Palestine

British anarchist Albert Meltzer's commentary on the Britain-Israel-Palestine crisis circa 1939.

Notes on the Freedom Anarchist Newspaper Archive

When Freedom updated its website back in October I took the opportunity to start a side project I've been meaning to do for a while - digitising Freedom's newspaper back catalogue. Herein some notes which are a bit internal-bloggy to put on the news site ...

Anarchism and the British warfare state: the prosecution of the 'war commentary' anarchists, 1945

Article by Carissa Honeywell, published in 'International Review of Social History', Volume 60, Issue 2, pp. 257-284 (August 2015). This article argues that in the closing months of World War II the British government decided to suppress War Commentary because officials feared that its polemic might foment political turmoil and thwart postwar policy agendas as military personnel began to demobilize and reassert their civilian identities.