colonialism

1947: The February 28 Incident

An account of the brutal repression of anti corruption and police brutality protests in Taiwan by the Chinese (Republic of China) military and KMT occupation.

1964: British troops put down mutinies in post-colonial Kenya, Tanganyika and Uganda

Just one month following Kenya's official independence, Jomo Kenyatta invited British troops to put down a mutiny of soldiers who were conducting a sit-down protest against the continued presence of British officers in the army and low pay. In the same week, the British also put down mutinies with similar demands in Julius Nyerere's Tanzania and Milton Obote's Uganda, also at invitation. All three armies had originated in the King's African Rifles.

Wartime strikes in Kenya - Makhan Singh

Makhan Singh on wartime strikes in Kenya, including struggles against conscript labour, railway strikes, and a general strike in Uganda in January 1945.

To Young Political Workers - Bhagat Singh

Bhagat Singh's address to young political workers, written one month before his execution. Notable is his warning that national liberation could result in simply the replacement of the raj by the new national bourgeoisie.

The settler-colonial control of Treaty in Aotearoa

An article which critiques treaties as a formalised mechanism legitimising settler-colonial control in Aotearoa, instead positing autonomous insurrection as an alternative means of collective emancipation.

Police massacre of striking Dunlop rubber plantation workers in Malaya

In December 1940 colonial police forces in Malaya arrested two strike leaders on suspicion of being communists. Police shot at 500 striking workers who were marching on the police station to protest the arrest, killing three workers and injuring more.

The 1947 Malagasay uprising

In 1947 an insurrection broke out in Madagascar, beginning with raids on police stations in the East and South then quickly spreading across the island. The French colonial government doubled its defence force in response, and the subsequent repression led to an estimated 90,000 or more deaths. While the revolt has been attributed to the reformist MDRM party, two underground organisations, Vy Vato Sakelika (VVS) and JINA, were instrumental in the early stages, although even they stated later that they did not begin the insurgency. Strikers at Renault in Paris denounced the repression.

Massacre in Algeria - Mohammed Harbi

Mohammed Harbi with Ben Bella

As France celebrated victory in Europe on 8 May 1945, its army was massacring thousands of civilians in Sétif and Guelma - events that were the real beginning of Algeria’s war of independence.

French Partisans on the 1945 Sétif massacre in Algeria

In May 1945 the French state committed a massacred thousands in Sétif, Algeria after a street demonstration marking the end of the Second World War adopted anti-colonial demands. Members of the French Communist Party (PCF) in De Gaulle's government supported the massacre, claiming that the anti-colonial demonstrators were supported by the Germans. The Sétif massacre is mentioned briefly by Frantz Fanon in the Wretched of the Earth.