Finally a Referendum to Repeal the 8th - Organising Made this Happen

Finally a Referendum to Repeal the 8th - Organising Made this Happen

The announcement that there will be a referendum to Repeal the hated 8th amendment is the product of decades of active campaigning. Pro-choice campaigners built for repeal ever since the referendum was passed in 1983.

If at first this seemed like a distant demand, now repeal looks by far the most likely outcome in May. The story of how this happened illustrates how change comes in general. That is not through elections but through people getting organised to demand that change, regardless of which politicians happen to be running the show in any particular year.

After all few would have predicted that it would have been a Fine Gael government supported by Fianna Fáil that would finally move forward on the referendum to repeal the 8th. We can say this with great certainty because when Labour were thrown out of power in the last election a range of pundits from the right and the left, including the Labour Party, tweeted very definite declarations that this meant there could be no referendum. How wrong they were but fortunately most pro-choice organisers stepped up their activity rather than waiting for the next election.

Who is in power is, of course, not completely irrelevant but significant changes are far, far more dependent on people organising themselves to demand change and forcing politicians to implement that change. Almost every significant change in political policy in Ireland, from the abolition of water charges to Repeal of the 8th has been an outcome of people organising together and mobilising to force change. Within this direct action played a key role in ensuring politicians cannot simply stick their heads in the sand.

With the water charges campaign it was mass non-payment and the disruption of meter installations that forced the politicians who insisted the charge was inevitable to abolish it. With the pro-choice movement it has been thousands of people per year, carrying unwanted pregnancies obtaining abortion pills for themselves and taking them in Ireland, despite being at risk of a 14 year prison sentence. Before and during the 1991 ‘x-case’ ‘illegal’ distribution of abortion information and huge marches demanding X be allowed travel played the same role and forced the politicians to call the 1992 referenda that saw the bans on abortion information and travel for abortion overturned.

Politicians have always been excellent at stepping in front of the cameras, right at the moment that movements, built by others are on the edge of success. Political careers are made or broken on the basis of the timing of this decision. There is of course some courage involved in that decision due to the risk being taken but the subsequent focus on the politician can give the impression that they are the reason for change, and not the movement they have stepped in front of.

The current wave of organising that won the holding of this referendum inherited the work of others but otherwise began in the protests against the Youth Defence billboards targeting women who had abortions in the summer of June 2012. Not for the first time arrogant attacks from anti-choice bigots galvanised an angry backlash and a new generation of resistance. In a similar but smaller way in the late 1980s SPUC brought together the organisers who put together the x-case march when SPUC went after students providing abortion information in guidebooks.

When the horrific news of the death of Savita Halappanavar circulated in the early Autumn of 2012 the pro-choice organisers of the Dublin demonstration knew each other from the protests against the billboards and were able to quickly organise. And after the initial protests they did not go home and wait for the next tragedy but started to do the ground work in preparing the movement that emerged - in particular through the creation of the Abortion Rights Campaign and the annual March for Choice that rapidly grew to mobilising 10s of thousands. Last year’s #Strike4Repeal which blocked O’Connell bridge and brought Dublin to a halt for the afternoon turned up the heat in demonstrating there could be consequences to politicians thinking they could simply ignore this growing movement.

There will be time after the referendum victory to write a detailed history of this movement but here we wanted to open this campaign by pointing out that it is not Leo or even the Citizens Assembly that is forcing change but the work of a mostly unknown set of organisers over the last few years. This understanding will matter in the aftermath of the referendum when we move on to fighting the problems in the legislation that will be introduced (and there will be problems). But it also matters to how we understand that we can collectively change all aspects of the world we live in. Solutions lie not through the selection of politicians but through the building of sustainable movement that are willing to take action to achieve their goals.

Republished from https://www.wsm.ie/c/finally-referendum-repeal8th-organising-made-happen

Image: https://www.facebook.com/shiranibolle

Comments

Spikymike
May 24 2018 12:10

Well it's not a case of anarchist direct action and certainly this reform of the law and even legalised abortion in itself is far from solving all the very many inter-related problems which capitalism and patriarchy impose on the lives of all people but if I had a vote in Eire (or Northern Ireland at some point) I would of course cast that vote in favour of this very specific and belated legal change. Does that contradict anything else I said on other threads about voting, 'identity' and 'reformist campaigns' - Some might think so!

Spikymike
May 28 2018 16:03

So a big majority vote fore the YES campaign - a lot more needs to happen to make that a useful practical result for many women. Next stop presumably Northern Ireland, but these single issue reforms however welcome will be operating within the declining conditions of a crisis ridden capitalism that will continue making free choices around having and bringing up children a real struggle for most.

Steven.
May 28 2018 23:40

Yeah a fantastic result in the referendum, and I must say one I was surprised about. In this instance the "shy" people in polling where the people in favour of repeal, whereas normally in the UK or US, you get "shy" right-wingers in polling

Flava O Flav
May 29 2018 10:06

SpikeyMike, I think you're missing loads of the picture. The referendum was the end of the campaign when the world took notice, it was getting to the referendum that involved direct action - the years of giving out illegal information until that part was legalised, the years of trafficking the abortion pill from the north risking jail and getting directly to people who needed it, organising and funding trips to England for those who needed to travel - it was all this that made the law unworkable and made the bodies of women, GQ and trans men ungovernable. Then there were the official campaigns Abortion Rights Campaign that anarchists played a central role in, Strike for Repeal, both involved considerable amounts of civil disobedience and were organised non-hierarchically as were many of the Together for Yes local groups - particularly our own in Drogheda. Out of that has come a network of organisers in the town bigger than anything it had before - bigger than any of the political parties locally, some of whom were anarchists before and we never knew each other, others who are now identifying as anarchists or showing an interest in anarchism due to the way we organised and the role anarchists played in organising the campaign - we have a whole lot of new projects coming out of this,

And yeah the north is next. We had people down in solidarity with repeal on a few occasions and some of us traveled north yesterday to their rally in Belfast. I think when you haven't grown up in the stifling atmosphere of catholic theocracy or when you haven't been attacked by anti-choicers - who are essentially fascists - one part of their movement is linked to European fascism and the other to the American Alt-Right - you don't realise what a ground shattering moment this is. Ten years ago if you'd asked me I would have said repeal of the 8th was only fractionally more likely than the revolution. Well here we are now, and this has really buoyed the confidence of people here that things can change if you put in the work. This is two major victories in a row - the water charges and repeal, after decades of defeat.

R Totale
May 29 2018 12:32

Flava - thanks for that post, I realise that there's generally an inverse correlation between how involved you are in movements and how much time you have to post on the internet but accounts by people who've been actively involved in successful mass movements are always really good to read, so thanks. Also, if it's not too offtopic, what is the current state of play with water charges, is it pretty much all over or is the localised resistance to meter installation still going on? I've not really been following things since the Jobstown verdict.

Flava O Flav
May 29 2018 13:32
R Totale wrote:
Flava - thanks for that post, I realise that there's generally an inverse correlation between how involved you are in movements and how much time you have to post on the internet but accounts by people who've been actively involved in successful mass movements are always really good to read, so thanks. Also, if it's not too offtopic, what is the current state of play with water charges, is it pretty much all over or is the localised resistance to meter installation still going on? I've not really been following things since the Jobstown verdict.

The government abolished the water charges. Metering stopped or was largely completed though in some areas they've been removed by 'meter faries'. There is talk of them at some stage trying to introduce an excessive use charge based on metering but for the moment it's all quiet on the water front.