Courses available on New Deal?

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Skips
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Mar 12 2009 11:30
Courses available on New Deal?

Ok so I have just been put on the New Deal. I was wondering if anyone has experience of the courses that you can do? I would like to teach english to asylum seekers and immigrants whilst converting them to anarchism. But would the new deal let me do this? I should have asked the woman who dealt with me but I forgot.

Does anyone have any opinions about new deal? I graduated recently from uni and have no experience so its no surprise I dont have a job in the current mess caused by the capitalists.

Skips
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Mar 12 2009 11:48

Haha yeah obviously im gonna leave that bit out when I ask her. Well I was just using converting as its a good word, im guessing most immigrants like most ppl around the world and here will not know about the great possibilities of anarchism.

Skips
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Mar 12 2009 11:55

Well I mean obviously I would help them learn english primarily. You don't wanna know what floats my boat =p

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oisleep
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Mar 12 2009 12:03
Quote:
So it is a religious belief.

it certainly requires a huge amount of faith (or false beliefs) at a level similar to that expressed by followers of other religions

radicalgraffiti
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Mar 12 2009 13:17
sickdog24 wrote:
Ok so I have just been put on the New Deal. I was wondering if anyone has experience of the courses that you can do? I would like to teach english to asylum seekers and immigrants whilst converting them to anarchism. But would the new deal let me do this? I should have asked the woman who dealt with me but I forgot.

Does anyone have any opinions about new deal? I graduated recently from uni and have no experience so its no surprise I dont have a job in the current mess caused by the capitalists.

If you are still unemployed after a few weeks thay will send you to a4e or some where like it, they call this an "option". you don't really get any choice over what course you do, and there's not much difference between them, for the vast majority of the time you have nothing to do anyway, and the qualifications you get from them are worthless. After you've been at a4e for a while they may give you a placement, this usually means working in a charity shop, although it could be something like a supermarket too, either way you don't get paid anything for it, though the business you work for may employ you when you new deal course finishes.

If you start the teaching english thing before you start the new deal course then you should be able to use that as your placement. If you are on placement you only have to attend a4e or what ever you have in your area one day a week instad of 5.

there's a few videos on you tube about a4e http://www.youtube.com/results?search_type=&search_query=a4e&aq=f (not the anime stuff smile )

web site about it here http://www.freewebs.com/watchinga4e/

and artical about some ones experinces here http://johnnyvoid.wordpress.com/2009/02/24/a4e-more-from-the-poverty-pimps/

Skips
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Mar 12 2009 13:32

Thanks radical, thats some great info. I have an appointment with the A4e thing, I am gonna get exploited but whats new. It will be good if im still unemployed by the time of the appointment to see how these things work out from the inside.

Im thinking of f ucking off for awhile as I could maybe teach english in another country.

no1
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Mar 12 2009 14:49

A friend of mine went to these usually completely useless and demeaning courses, and so she criticised how useless they were in getting a decent job, disrupting the class somewhat. Other people on the class were agreeing with her, and so they became a bit difficult to control. Then they offered her a job at the Jobcentre, presumably to get rid of a troublemaker by making her switch sides. Possible strategy for getting a job while carrying out your politics if you're desperate!

Skips
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Mar 12 2009 16:39

Haha possible strategy indeed. I don't know though, I doubt the job centre would wanna employ me anyhow!

posi
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Mar 13 2009 11:43

If you want to get into teaching english as a second or other language, you need to do a CELTA course - this is the standard qualification in the field.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cambridge_English_Language_Teaching_Accreditation

You will probably have to pay, but might be able to work out some kind of assistance. Use google to find places near you, and take it from there.

My partner teaches English to recently arrived migrant women. According to her, though there is not alot of room for talking about the finer points of ideology, the way you go about teaching can carry alot of politics with it, in terms of bringing out students' experiences, talking about skills for life in the UK (how you talk about the police, how you talk about work, how you talk about family, other cultures, etc.). But then she sets her own curriculum and lesson plans, you might not have so much freedom working for one of the big commercial colleges...

Good luck.

EDIT: that's a great article on the johnnyvoid blog, who ever wrote it. Really shows you how the different bits of the system fit together to fuck people over, and how permeated they are with unaccountable abuse.

Skips
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Mar 13 2009 11:20

Thank you posi. For that info. I will look into it. Yeah I guess to understand the different political ideologies first they will have to grasp the language that I speak.

posi
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Mar 13 2009 11:47

well, no, they might already grasp the ideology (or another ideology, perhaps even a bette one) in their own language. I reckon your average Latin American immigrant (or perhaps immigrants in general) is more politicised than your average British ESOL techer.

The people you teach have probably had implicitly political experiences back home - strikes, riots, etc. Why assume you've got to impart something to them, rather than finding out where they're coming from, what they already know, helping them to share those things with each other, etc?

I think teaching ESOL is good work, but my impression is that it's important to be respectful of students and recognise what they already know, rather than assuming they're thick...

Skips
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Mar 13 2009 13:04

I am respectful of most ppl. I never said I thought they were thick. If the discussion comes to politics I will tell them what I believe in, share experiences and we can discuss. Im a latin american immigrant myself.

akai
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Mar 14 2009 10:21

I think it would make sense to do topical lessons with them based around real-life issues. You need to prepare them to function in the real world. First and foremost they need to improve vocabulary, build speaking skills, etc. Usually the latter means that you can have discussions with them. Then you can illicit their opinions, experiences, etc. on different matters. Every know and again you can throw in anarchist points of view, but don't look at is as a strict presentation of an ideology. Anarchist points of view are generally controversial and can stimulate good discussion. With immigrants you can start off slowly through other topics - for example, about the immigration system. You can help them with vocabularly they need to know for example for dealing with the system - they know about the system first hand but might not be able to deal with it in English to the degree they need. Then you can have some articles about control of immigrants and present for example something about anarchists who want to eliminate all borders and don't believe in the nation-state. You could also do a lesson on work conditions and eventually get to an anarchist slant. You just have to remember that teaching doesn't mean that you present ideas and people automatically understand or agree with them; they will debate, some will say it's stupid, etc. etc. But you can succeed in exposing people to these ideas in this way without giving them the feeling that they are being indoctrinated. Sometimes you also have to present other ideas for a balance.

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cantdocartwheels
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Mar 15 2009 07:57

I think it would make sense to do topical lessons with them based around real-life issues. You need to prepare them to function in the real world.

Thats not going to be hard, last time i taught english we started working out of these textbooks, and they just interupted us about halfway through the lesson. Basically the first thing they're going to ask you is ''how do i get a job'', it doesn;t make for an easy answer because realistically its hard to get anything decent.
I'd recommend taking some translated trade union stuff like worksmart guides (its not available in all languages mind) and maybe something like the libcom workplace guide or stuff your boss down when you go.

I dunno about courses, even though your not a student you can volunteer with STAR
http://www.star-network.org.uk/index.php/ depending on what part of the UK your in??
I'd warn you though, if your thinking about this as a career then in the long term getting an actual paid job at a refugee charity/organisation is pretty hard, your literally up against hundreds of applicants for every job.

Skips
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Mar 28 2009 16:20

Cheers for the link. The idea has kinda went out the window as they wont fund me, plus its a crazy price anyway to do any of those courses...tefl, celta so I don't blame them.

Getting a job is proving very hard for me.

Caiman del Barrio
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Apr 7 2009 16:22

Hey, got an interview for an EFL placement tomorrow...any tips? I'm gonna rip some ideas off this thread cos the job'd be in Latin America so I'd be preparing many kids for immigration.

Skips
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Apr 7 2009 20:36

Hope you get the job.if its a teaching job?

This is what i done for a british council job interview i had the other month(which i didnt get!)it was to be a english teaching assistant. I don't know if this is the type of stuff you would do? anyway here is some tips-

the interviewers want to hear about teaching stuff.So you need to say that you are going to focus on what you as a native speaker can give them that they wouldn't be able to get from textbooks etc such as practicing their oral communication with a native speaker -main focus on getting them to home their oral and listening skills but also the cultural knowledge that as a native speaker you can bring to your classes-through you they will learn so much about what it's really like to live in the UK, be a young person in the UK, exchange experience, finding innvative, fun, more dynamic ways such as song lyrics + songs to illustrate a particluar grammar point

You can also talk about how you aim to make the classes more, interactive, fun, dynamic enjoyable, based on your own experience of language learing-you know what types of excercises worked best with you and you are going to try to make your classes as dynamic as possible to keep the students interested and keep classes fun.

You will use all differnt types of media, song, videos, you tube, newspaper and magazine cuttings, trying to make the class as fun and as different as possible and to get maximum participation out of the students.

It is basically all that type of bullshit you have to spout !!!

Caiman del Barrio
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Apr 16 2009 23:45
sickdog24 wrote:
Hope you get the job.if its a teaching job?

This is what i done for a british council job interview i had the other month(which i didnt get!)it was to be a english teaching assistant. I don't know if this is the type of stuff you would do? anyway here is some tips-

Thanks, appreciated.

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jef costello
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Apr 8 2009 00:21

If you haven't got a TEFL then tell them you're planning on getting one. If you're not going as part of your degree then it's harder to get (as far as I know) so you'll need to look good.
sickdog's advice sounds really good. You might want to add in or invent some previous experience working with young people, preferably voluntary as it will show your commitment. Involvement in afterschool activities is another thing they'll like.

Caiman del Barrio
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Apr 8 2009 00:28

Well I sometimes voluntarily babysit 18 year old drunk anarchists.

RE: TEFL, explicitly says that no qualifications are necessary...can I really get away with lying? (Probably won't have time to get it, let alone money.)

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jef costello
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Apr 8 2009 09:02
Caiman del Barrio wrote:
Well I sometimes voluntarily babysit 18 year old drunk anarchists.

Depends on how you put it smile

Quote:
RE: TEFL, explicitly says that no qualifications are necessary...can I really get away with lying? (Probably won't have time to get it, let alone money.)

Up to you really, you don't need one but it might be handy as you're applying outside of the uni system. It will show willing on your part and might set you apart from gap year kids although most of them will actually have a tefl smile

Skips
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Apr 16 2009 18:53

tefl will set you back one thousand pound mate, I think?

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jef costello
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Apr 16 2009 23:29

it's not that much, depending on where you go. I've not got one myself though. Most places just give them to you if you pay the fee from what I've heard.

Did you get the job Alan?

Caiman del Barrio
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Apr 16 2009 23:43

...will know by the end of the month. You're right though, other than this one it appears to the be exception in not requiring a TEFL, although apparently I have a chance of getting work in some parts if I just show up at a school on the first day of term.

Gonna edit out the specifics of my job btw, maybe not wise considering there's a small chance of me getting it. wink