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anti-nuclear movement

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henry
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Joined: 12-09-04
Sep 13 2004 10:09
anti-nuclear movement

I am a believer that we should be trying to build up a grassroots network of anarchists across Scotland, and eventually UK, europe. Stuff like the G8 will give us a opportunity to test out how strong we could become. But other stuff like nuclear weapons should become a top priority, as nukes are the ultimate expression of imperialist violence, and they happen to be based in Scotland. I think it is pure laziness for any activist who is concerned about nuclear weapons to refer the issue to the 'experts' in cnd , when we should be taking action ourselves and learning from our own experiences. Big blockades might cause inconvience for a couple of days in the year, and they don't really work because the coppers know about it beforehand and are prepared. CND don't seem to understand the concept of surprise. For real civil disobediance to become a success activists would need to be prepared to hassle the authorities constantly throughout the year. I'm not talking about 1,000 strong blockades every month, because that would be unrealistic, but 10 folk a week could easily cause hassle by chaining themselves to a fence, or getting through the fences. Trident ploughshares do that already with some success, and NukeWatch do good work trying to block convoys, but a Scotland-wide network of volunteers preparing to harrass the authorities when they least expect it would scare the government, and would be harder to inflitrate.

And we could also raise awareness by raising money to pay for fines.

nuclearcivvy
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Joined: 8-10-04
Oct 10 2004 20:50

Pay fines? Pffft. Yeah right. roll eyes

The big blockade on the 23rd was only part of the story. We were there for two weeks. actions were happening daily. Intrusions, invasions, vigils, aquatic actions. There was even a sunday service at the main gate.

Lots of those actions were surprises. Several groups attacked the fences of Faslane and Coulport at night. Large groups turned up at the gates of coulport unannounced, to have a party.

The result of all this was that they needed huge amounts of police there for the whole fortnight.

Our chances are greatly increased by numbers, so the big blockade is most effective. It may be too easy for them to contain (and single out) a small number of regular protesters.

Fundraising is a serious problem for a cellular network. If each cell has it's own fundraising for it's own bits. then we only need to make sure there's a group covering each aspect.

I'm looking at camp facilities. Teepees and portaloos. Someone suggested a geodome, but we would have to raise a lot for them. The obvious way to raise funds is a benefit gig. lots of small ones are OK, but I've heard several people suggest a big one with major celebrities, a live CD, etc. I can arrange smaller gigs. We have a 700w PA available here for £60, someone with ADAT recording, and a group who can burn CD's for £1 each. (100 a day max.)

Know any celebrities?

henry
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Joined: 12-09-04
Oct 24 2004 13:20

Here's an idea. What if new members to a anti-nuclear movement were told that 10% of their membership fee was to be put towards a fund for paying fines and sending to prisoners?

Now how many more members would you then get if they knew that part of their fee was not to spent on leaflets, but would go direct to supporting a activist?

You could also argue that paying that fee would make that member a assessory to a 'crime', and that would make the legal implications interesting.

Big Blockades: The blockades at Faslane don't inconveniance the police because they get paid a wad of cash for overtime and other benefits for what is basically a friendly party like occasion. And the court judges and clerks and admin get overtime.

A better idea would be that instead of just doing a couple of blockades per year, why not advertise one a month. Off course you might only get fifty demonstrators one month, and maybe a few hundred another month, but you would keep the authorities on standby all year long by having them to prepare for each new blockade. The aims of these blockades would be to exchaust the authorities and their ability to cope.

Now you might say that their is not enough resources or money to cope with organising 12 blockades a years, but I would disagree because most activists are self-sufficient, and the only things to organise is buses, leaflets, and sending out letters and emails. Probaly organising accommodation would have to be looked at, but in Glasgow their are several places that can be used at short notice.

Lizzie
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Joined: 9-10-04
Oct 29 2004 18:37

Spontaneous blockades of Faslane and Coulport happen all the time, mostly Trident Ploughshares or Faslane Peace Camp. They certainly appear to cause more disruption than Big Blockades. Four of us at one gate and four at the other gate held them up for an hour one morning before getting nicked and the traffic was tailed back for 6 miles.

Although you don't see big tailbacks at Big Blockades and in spite of what the base PR says it is extremely disruptive to have all their gates blocked even when they do know about it in advance. Lots of people don't even bother going to work, and even for the sad cases that go in early to avoid the hold-ups that in itself is a disruption to peoples lives that must at least make them acknowledge that someone doesn't like what they do for a living.

Big Blockades fill a particular role. They are planned actions that give an opporunity for those that choose to oppose nukes by direct action a chance to go out and encourage others to join them. Training, transport, legal support, food is all laid on - it makes it so easy to take the plunge and enjoy the liberation of disobedience. For many of the folk that come along it is a big step. Big Blockades also provide a space for people that support direct action but for one reason or another can't take part themselves to come along to show their solidarity. Of course we also get some media coverage out of it, not the main aim but it helps with getting the issue raised.

I think there is a place for both. I would love to see Faslane blockaded every day of the year. The more people doing actions the more the police have to respond, and the courts have to decide whether to prosecute. In spite of just about exhausting all legal arguments we will continue because this is just to important to give up on. So come on, Big Blockades, wee blockades - just do it! And you don't need someone to organise it for you. The gates are there all the time - just get a group together and start planning.

As for a fines fund: I think people have a lot more potential to collect money from friends and supporters for their individual case than a big centralised fund. If theres not enough to cover everyone then who decides who gets it? And some of us don't pay fines on principle.

Lizzie
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Joined: 9-10-04
Oct 29 2004 18:37

Spontaneous blockades of Faslane and Coulport happen all the time, mostly Trident Ploughshares or Faslane Peace Camp. They certainly appear to cause more disruption than Big Blockades. Four of us at one gate and four at the other gate held them up for an hour one morning before getting nicked and the traffic was tailed back for 6 miles.

Although you don't see big tailbacks at Big Blockades and in spite of what the base PR says it is extremely disruptive to have all their gates blocked even when they do know about it in advance. Lots of people don't even bother going to work, and even for the sad cases that go in early to avoid the hold-ups that in itself is a disruption to peoples lives that must at least make them acknowledge that someone doesn't like what they do for a living.

Big Blockades fill a particular role. They are planned actions that give an opporunity for those that choose to oppose nukes by direct action a chance to go out and encourage others to join them. Training, transport, legal support, food is all laid on - it makes it so easy to take the plunge and enjoy the liberation of disobedience. For many of the folk that come along it is a big step. Big Blockades also provide a space for people that support direct action but for one reason or another can't take part themselves to come along to show their solidarity. Of course we also get some media coverage out of it, not the main aim but it helps with getting the issue raised.

I think there is a place for both. I would love to see Faslane blockaded every day of the year. The more people doing actions the more the police have to respond, and the courts have to decide whether to prosecute. In spite of just about exhausting all legal arguments we will continue because this is just to important to give up on. So come on, Big Blockades, wee blockades - just do it! And you don't need someone to organise it for you. The gates are there all the time - just get a group together and start planning.

As for a fines fund: I think people have a lot more potential to collect money from friends and supporters for their individual case than a big centralised fund. If theres not enough to cover everyone then who decides who gets it? And some of us don't pay fines on principle.

henry
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Joined: 12-09-04
Nov 3 2004 14:16

The idea of a 'fine fund', was to offer support to activists. Some folk don't pay fines on principle, and some folk end up in jail where money is often needed to survive.

I am not sure that friends and families should be paying fines. I just think that since members support organisations like CND, then the favour should be returned and CND should be doing more to support members when support is needed.

There is nothing wrong with demanding that SCND pushes it's contribution to the absolute limit.

nuclearcivvy
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Joined: 8-10-04
Nov 3 2004 15:52

If not having those funds available meant SCND being any less effective, then most would prefer to forgo any help, and sort it themselves. It'd be nice to have assistance for extreme hardship cases, but not at the expense of the cause overall.

bandu
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Joined: 24-10-04
Nov 6 2004 11:08

There would have to be a defination of 'hardship cases'. People in jail are often going to come up against some real problems which I don't need to discuss here. Money is needed to survive in such a environment and maybe there is a strong case for money being raised to help out.

As for a 'fine fund, I'm not so sure, it could bankrupt SCND especially in this new emerging draconian climate with anti-social behaviour orders (ASBO) and the Anti-terrorist act 2000 now being used against peaceful protest.

Anonymous
Nov 8 2004 00:02

A prisoners' fund would be a good idea but I agree that bankruptcy of SCND is a bad idea - maybe we need more fundraising/socials to support those prepared to defy the 'law'.? I do think there needs to be more formal support for people and we can do that amongst ourselves.

JH

pj
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Joined: 11-10-04
Dec 1 2004 19:10
Quote:
"CND don't seem to understand the concept of surprise. For real civil disobediance to become a success activists would need to be prepared to hassle the authorities constantly throughout the year. I'm not talking about 1,000 strong blockades every month, because that would be unrealistic, but 10 folk a week could easily cause hassle by chaining themselves to a fence, or getting through the fences. Trident ploughshares do that already with some success, and NukeWatch do good work trying to block convoys, but a Scotland-wide network of volunteers preparing to harrass the authorities when they least expect it would scare the government, and would be harder to inflitrate.

Hey Henry just some facts that might surprise you. CND organises the blockades WITH Trident Ploughshares (it's not just CND who organises them)

People in CND who organise the blockades=Nukewatch=Trident Ploughshares = many of the same folk... strange that, but don't let facts get in the way of your arguement...

When was the last time you "got through the fences"? Any tips on how we deal with the double thickness weld-mesh?

Stop posturing, stop criticisng other people's efforts - just get on with it.

You might want to come along to the 2 day anti-war forum we're organising in Kinning Park on 11th & 12th December - it would be a good chance to discuss your ideas with others...

Actually I agree with what I think you're getting at - but I'm not an "expert"