What should be done with the top floor of the vacant New York Times building?

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woundedhobo
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Joined: 16-02-04
Feb 22 2009 17:25
What should be done with the top floor of the vacant New York Times building?

Every day I hear about the rapid demise of the daily newspapers. With competition from the Internet, it is rapidly becoming a not-for-profit industry. One of the frequent concerns raised is "How will people get their local news when the local newspaper no longer exists?".

It seems to me that the perfect answer would be to create a neighborhood radio station. When you strip away government barriers to market entry, I have heard it is very cheap to go on the air if it is micropower, the staff is all volunteer... Also ,very little space is needed. In North Oakland my former house donated a small bedroom to Berkeley Liberation Radio when they needed to find a new home.And you cannot tell me that a community exists where there are not dozens of subcultures and organizations wanting to get their voice on the airwaves. So if there is a news story to report just call up the local radio station and see if you can get an interview or talk to a friend that has a show.

Already there are some low power FM stations in the United States that exist without sanction from the government. In San Francisco one such group is using a clause in the government regulations stating that during times of war you do not need a license. And apparently they have been going for years now.

So why is this not being done more? Is it easier to just use the Internet?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pirate_Cat_Radio
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Dunifer

petey
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Joined: 13-10-05
Feb 22 2009 17:55

http://www.whitney.org/www/2008biennial/www/?section=artists&page=artist_npr

akai
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Joined: 29-09-06
Feb 22 2009 18:32

Pirate radio is still done, but it's becoming less popular as radio is less popular. Back in the old days, I remember the problems as being the following: avoiding getting busted, getting good enough range, tech problems, keeping enough interest.

I think seeing how the internet is going, we'd better get back to learning radio. smile

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OliverTwister
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Joined: 10-10-05
Feb 22 2009 22:22

What's a community?

woundedhobo
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Joined: 16-02-04
Feb 24 2009 02:26

Does anyone have data on what is happening to the popularity of talk radio? I did all kinds of searches on Google but I could not find anyone talking about it. Meanwhile, just last night I heard that Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. has a stock value now that is down 70% from 12 months ago according to the author of "The man who owns the news", and here is an article indicating that Murdoch is doing relatively well:http://www.tnr.com/politics/story.html?id=a4e2aafc-cc92-4e79-90d1-db3946a6d119 when it states that the average stock price drop has been 80% in the same timeframe.