** j30 - Generalise the Strike - Day of action against the cuts **

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raw
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May 29 2011 14:32
** j30 - Generalise the Strike - Day of action against the cuts **

30th June 2011 may well turn out to be the most important step forward in a mass fight against public sector cuts. Hundreds of thousands of workers could be involved in strike action, from as many as four or five different unions including NUT, PCS, UCU
and ATL.

Often strike action can be ignored by those in power but also the vast majority of workers not in unions or directly effected by the issues. Therefore we, rank & file union members, students, precarious workers & unemployed are calling for a mass show of solidarity for those taking strike action and to generalise the strike on June 30th.

From early morning pickets, direct actions, occupations & demonstrations - whatever you're into - lets all do it on June 30th and amplify the resistance to austerity. This call to action is going out to activist direct action groups, local anti cuts groups, radical political groups,
radical unions and student university occupations.

Facebook Event: http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=100787720014939

Upcoming J30 Strike Assemblies across the country.

** Birmingham **

j30 Strike Assembly // 3pm 11th Saturday June
Meet Guild of Students Reception (University of Birmingham)
Come to the action planing meeting - bring ideas, friends, creativity

Facebook Event: http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=117940408290663

** Leeds **

j30 Strike Assembly // 6pm 6th Monday June
Room 263, The Rosebowl, Leeds Met.
A call to all those in Leeds interested in resisting austerity cuts and beyond.
First meeting to discuss June 30th strikes.

Facebook Event: http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=151694614900989

** London **

j30 Strike Assembly // 7pm 6th Monday June
7pm Monday June 6th ( Bloomsbury Venue TBC )

Following on from the call for an open assembly to discuss, propose and
organise for the first round of co-ordinated strike actions on June 30th, over
100 people turned up and squeezed into the Marchmont Centre in Bloomsbury on
Monday 23rd May. Come to the next mass assembly. Everyone invited.
Bring ideas for actions!
Read the report here: http://london.indymedia.org/articles/9136

Facebook Event: http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=101026063323724

** Norwich **
5.30pm Friday 3rd June
Union House, UEA (Room TBC)
http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=132862323458135

There are also meetings being organised in Newcastle, Oxford & Surrey. Dates to
be announced.

If you want to link up with others in your area to help organise solidarity for
the early
morning pickets on June 30th then email: june30action@gmail.com

Follow @j30Strike on Twitter / Email: june30action@gmail.com
/ Announcement e-list: j30strikeassembly-updates-subscribe@lists.riseup.net

raw
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May 30 2011 09:57

** NEW -- Additional J30 Assemblies **

Norwich
5.30pm Friday 3rd June
Union House, UEA (Room TBC)
http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=132862323458135

Sheffield
4pm Saturday 11th June
Large Conference Room, SADACCA Day Care Centre
4 Willey Street
Sheffield S3
http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=219891598039474

** Local J30 Event Pages **

Bristol
J30 Strike Page by Bristol Anti-Cuts Alliance
http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=120183248064718&ref=ts

Surrey
J30 Strike Page
http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=231453896867987

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Jun 5 2011 12:00

Has a venue been confirmed for the meeting in London tomorrow?

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Jun 5 2011 12:20

Working to finalise the details regarding the venue today but there will be a strike assembly in Oxford on either the 11th or the 12th of June.

Will post here when everything is finalised.

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fingers malone
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Jun 5 2011 14:28
miles wrote:
Has a venue been confirmed for the meeting in London tomorrow?

ULU, Malet Street, WC1 2nd Floor, 7pm

Jason Cortez
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Jun 5 2011 17:26

Local Lewisham event 7.30pm Tuesday 7th June at Room 143, Richard Hoggart Building (main building), Goldsmiths University,
Facebook event here

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Ellar
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Jun 5 2011 19:06

Is there a leaflet I can print off which explains the changes to pensions and why education workers are striking?

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Joseph Kay
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Jun 5 2011 19:42

Some SolFed education workers have made this, plus this aimed at encouraging a school-kids walkout.

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Jun 5 2011 20:23

Thanks JK

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Ellar
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Jun 5 2011 20:30

http://www.facebook.com/#!/event.php?eid=108774772547579

march organised for london on the day....

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Jun 7 2011 13:02

There was a huge attendance at this yesterday, I found the whole thing very interesting and will post up some more detailed feedback a bit later - what are other attenders thoughts on the meeting?

raw
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Jun 7 2011 14:19
miles wrote:
There was a huge attendance at this yesterday, I found the whole thing very interesting and will post up some more detailed feedback a bit later - what are other attenders thoughts on the meeting?

Will write a report/decisions on the meeting later this evening. I think it was good, very good actually. I think we had around 100 people, possibly more.

Caiman del Barrio
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Jun 7 2011 19:33

A timely reminder of why I renounced anarchism in the first place. London anarchism's a weird hotch potch of liberalism, Leninism and misanthropy, all bound together by the glue of hobbyist adventurism.

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Jun 7 2011 20:17
Caiman del Barrio wrote:
A timely reminder of why I renounced anarchism in the first place. London anarchism's a weird hotch potch of liberalism, Leninism and misanthropy, all bound together by the glue of hobbyist adventurism.

I'm not sure what you were expecting - this wasn't called out as an political meeting was it? Yes, there was a hotch potch of people with different concerns and approaches and at one point I thought the whole thing was going to go the way of focussing on some kind of a 'spectacular'... Certainly there were plenty of 'liberals' there, for example the guy who name checked 'real democracy' in the Spanish movement (which, as far as I understand, were the main conservative force in the assemblies) to name but one. Fortunately, plenty of others wanted to focus on the assembly / meeting / local organising aspect.

raw
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Jun 7 2011 22:15
Caiman del Barrio wrote:
A timely reminder of why I renounced anarchism in the first place. London anarchism's a weird hotch potch of liberalism, Leninism and misanthropy, all bound together by the glue of hobbyist adventurism.

What did that meeting have to do with Anarchism? Do you honestly believe that the meeting was filled with anarchists? No, it was filled with a vast cross section of concerns and people from different background, different experiences and means of organising - trade unionists, students, teachers, workers, radicals...etc.

Maybe we were at different meetings. And aren't you a member of an anarchist group? So not sure how that fits with
renouncing anarchism. roll eyes

raw
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Jun 7 2011 21:41
miles wrote:
Caiman del Barrio wrote:
A timely reminder of why I renounced anarchism in the first place. London anarchism's a weird hotch potch of liberalism, Leninism and misanthropy, all bound together by the glue of hobbyist adventurism.

I'm not sure what you were expecting - this wasn't called out as an political meeting was it? Yes, there was a hotch potch of people with different concerns and approaches and at one point I thought the whole thing was going to go the way of focussing on some kind of a 'spectacular'... Certainly there were plenty of 'liberals' there, for example the guy who name checked 'real democracy' in the Spanish movement (which, as far as I understand, were the main conservative force in the assemblies) to name but one. Fortunately, plenty of others wanted to focus on the assembly / meeting / local organising aspect.

The majority of the UK is liberal Miles, maybe its because we live in a liberal democracy. The point is to debate and evolve the discussion, which was done. Now all those groups like ICC that were pushing for an assembly need to put the work in because that is what we had consensus on for parliament square on the day.

Caiman del Barrio
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Jun 11 2011 13:11
raw wrote:
Caiman del Barrio wrote:
A timely reminder of why I renounced anarchism in the first place. London anarchism's a weird hotch potch of liberalism, Leninism and misanthropy, all bound together by the glue of hobbyist adventurism.

What did that meeting have to do with Anarchism? Do you honestly believe that the meeting was filled with anarchists? No, it was filled with a vast cross section of concerns and people from different background, different experiences and means of organising - trade unionists, students, teachers, workers, radicals...etc.

Maybe we were at different meetings. And aren't you a member of an anarchist group? So not sure how that fits with
renouncing anarchism. roll eyes

Apologies for my tone in the first post, I was frustrated by it but I get that it's not a constructive way to convey that.

I think that Raw's reply is somewhat disingenuous: the meeting was majority anarchists, and was definitely 'anarcho' in its orientation. The conversations and 'debates' were very much run of the mill for the kinda vague anti-globalisation morass that hung over UK anarchism for much of the first decade of the milennium. I had a real sense that very very little had been learnt in the last 10 years. I know that there were a few new folk there, but the people who were pushing for useless or counter-productive stuff were old, seasoned veterans with their particular fetishes.

How many fucking times can one person say "Spanish flavour"? Why is Chris Knight - a fucking crypto-Stalinist with a personality cult - allowed to dominate these sorts of proceedings? Why do people wanna recreate Democracy Village, which was a massive fucking embarassment for the radical movement? Why is there such an overwhelming orientation towards "attacking bankers"? Why is there such an obsession with this homage to tactics which haven't even really worked in other countries (the so called 'assemblies') with no regard for national context or even the fucking weather?

Sorry but I found it a hugely demoralising experience and I know I wasn't the only one.

EDIT also these constant references to "the Spanish movement" are ignorant to the point of prejudice. Why must all Spanish radicals - and by extension, all Spaniards in the UK - be wrapped up within this recent, rather tenuous assembly fetish that's spreading? I know of loads of Spanish radicals in London who haven't even been to the assemblies and carry on organising in their workplaces/communities or even amongst the Spanish-language scene. It's lazy and borders on identity politics to refer to a handful of Spaniards outside the Embassy as "the Spanish movement". I think it serves the interests of a handful of assembly fetishists from a secretive Trot group who are promoting this agenda.

raw
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Jun 11 2011 16:21
Caiman del Barrio wrote:
I think that Raw's reply is somewhat disingenuous: the meeting was majority anarchists, and was definitely 'anarcho' in its orientation. The conversations and 'debates' were very much run of the mill for the kinda vague anti-globalisation morass that hung over UK anarchism for much of the first decade of the milennium. I had a real sense that very very little had been learnt in the last 10 years. I know that there were a few new folk there, but the people who were pushing for useless or counter-productive stuff were old, seasoned veterans with their particular fetishes.

Most of the people pushing for stuff were students from the various nov/dec occupations. As for the camp people, I've never knew them before the assemblies and though they may have had previous experience I wouldn't neccesarily refer to them as old, seasoned veterans

Caiman del Barrio wrote:
How many fucking times can one person say "Spanish flavour"? Why is Chris Knight - a fucking crypto-Stalinist with a personality cult - allowed to dominate these sorts of proceedings? Why do people wanna recreate Democracy Village, which was a massive fucking embarassment for the radical movement? Why is there such an overwhelming orientation towards "attacking bankers"? Why is there such an obsession with this homage to tactics which haven't even really worked in other countries (the so called 'assemblies') with no regard for national context or even the fucking weather?

Chris only spoke one or two times during the 2 and half hour meeting. The point was clearly made about criticisms to camping and assemblies without a context. but this was also conflated with discussions around the PCS organised march and rally and members of ICC made suggestions on how we need to be engaging and communicating with strikers at that demo above and beyond the union. The result was this agreement:

J30Assembly wrote:
5. To organise a Strikers Assembly outside Westminster Hall, the end point of the trade union march on June 30th at around 1pm, for those who are picketing in central london.

This has also been supported by the assembly outside the spanish embassy and there is a meeting to discuss this further on Monday at 5.30pm. It is still an open process and I for one do NOT want to see it become some hippy peace camp ego-trip, its purpose is fundamentally trying to engage with the 10,000 trade unionists on the march in an inclusive way. Politically I have no problem with that if it works.

Caiman del Barrio wrote:
Sorry but I found it a hugely demoralising experience and I know I wasn't the only one.

It is frustrating but don't assume that there is ever an easy option to organising with people from different backgrounds.Its a process that we should all learn the mechanics of as its in public spaces like that where our ideas are challenged and where our ideas need to be challenging. I hope you and SolFed continue with this process as I hope it can lead to something permanent in London or atleast introduce a new culture of common organising.

Personally speaking I think the J30 Assembly has already achieved a lot by agreeing this call out for the day:

J30Assembly wrote:
1. A call to stop work on June 30th - strike, call in sick or take the day off

2. To mobilise and support early morning pickets of striking workers

3. To organise local initiatives to link up pickets with marches between different sites.

4.To promote diverse forms of actions to publicise and circulate the struggles

5. To organise a Strikers Assembly outside Westminster Hall, the end point of the trade union march on June 30th at around 1pm, for those who are picketing in central london.

6. To call for autonomous actions in the City of London, the heart of the financial district, from the afternoon onwards.

Caiman del Barrio wrote:
EDIT also these constant references to "the Spanish movement" are ignorant to the point of prejudice. Why must all Spanish radicals - and by extension, all Spaniards in the UK - be wrapped up within this recent, rather tenuous assembly fetish that's spreading? I know of loads of Spanish radicals in London who haven't even been to the assemblies and carry on organising in their workplaces/communities or even amongst the Spanish-language scene. It's lazy and borders on identity politics to refer to a handful of Spaniards outside the Embassy as "the Spanish movement". I think it serves the interests of a handful of assembly fetishists from a secretive Trot group who are promoting this agenda.

Don't really get what you mean here. Its our "job" to engage with struggles as and when they form. Thats why we have had such a close connection with these young spanish workers ( and I've been told they seem themselves as workers not students if thats important or not ). It seems like we are damned if we do and damned if we don't.

Anyway, there are numerous strategies and points of action that groups like SolFed and others are involved with on June30th. The fact that we have them out in the open - though SolFed failed to make their proposal last monday - means we can all learn and critique what works and what doesn't. I am looking forward to post J30 meeting and see what we have learned and what can work better next time for the next round of strikes in October.

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AIW
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Jun 11 2011 16:32

Newcastle
Tuesday June 14 / 7 to 9 pm
Star & Shadow

Caiman del Barrio
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Jun 11 2011 23:15
raw wrote:
Caiman del Barrio wrote:
I think that Raw's reply is somewhat disingenuous: the meeting was majority anarchists, and was definitely 'anarcho' in its orientation. The conversations and 'debates' were very much run of the mill for the kinda vague anti-globalisation morass that hung over UK anarchism for much of the first decade of the milennium. I had a real sense that very very little had been learnt in the last 10 years. I know that there were a few new folk there, but the people who were pushing for useless or counter-productive stuff were old, seasoned veterans with their particular fetishes.

Most of the people pushing for stuff were students from the various nov/dec occupations. As for the camp people, I've never knew them before the assemblies and though they may have had previous experience I wouldn't neccesarily refer to them as old, seasoned veterans

With that comment I was largely referring to the two individuals who have been pushing for the camps and assemblies: one's a Leninist CPGB reject with frankly terrifying delusions and - bearing that in mind - a weird and highly depressing personality cult around him, while the other's a former minion of his who's now a Trot playing at being an anarcho, who's been fetishing fucking assemblies over every e-list that will have him for about 3 years now.

I recognise that the woman who said that "people are stupid" appeared to be newer. Most of the folk arguing for doing A Hitherto To Be Confirmed Massive Anarchy in the City weren't though, and you could tell that, cos the rhetoric and arguments were straight outta J18!

It really really beggars belief that some self-defined 'anarchists' still believe in this idiotic 'banker' bogeyman who's the enemy of all. The thinking seems to go something like this:

Capitalism...BAD
Capitalism...BANKER
Banker...WANKER
Banker...LIVE IN CITY
City...BAD
City...ATTACK

This is where the contemporary anarchist 'movement' enters Home Counties Mail reader territory, with all sorts of lazy, inaccurate stereotypes coupled with an action plan that - even if their uninformed, self-parodying misunderstanding of 21st century capitalism were true - actually goes nowhere near reaching the intended targets. Like a couple of folk kept pointing out, not only does the City employ some 300,000 folk - possibly 2/3 of whom will be in menial janitorial/ancillary/technical roles, with similar job descriptions to their counterparts in the public sector - but the BASTARD BANKER STRAWMEN who you all apparently wanna target will most likely be able - and accustomed - to hotdesking, using an iPad, Blackberry, or whatever the fuck piece of shit technology's hot right now, to do so. And that's not even MENTIONING the Guantanamo-esque security system they have around the Square Mile, with automated bollards, 20/20 CCTV coverage, etc, etc...

Raw wrote:
Caiman del Barrio wrote:
How many fucking times can one person say "Spanish flavour"? Why is Chris Knight - a fucking crypto-Stalinist with a personality cult - allowed to dominate these sorts of proceedings? Why do people wanna recreate Democracy Village, which was a massive fucking embarassment for the radical movement? Why is there such an overwhelming orientation towards "attacking bankers"? Why is there such an obsession with this homage to tactics which haven't even really worked in other countries (the so called 'assemblies') with no regard for national context or even the fucking weather?

Chris only spoke one or two times during the 2 and half hour meeting. The point was clearly made about criticisms to camping and assemblies without a context.

Right, but his words clearly carried more weight than most others. Everyone recognised him and paid him plenty of attention. Plus, he may have only gone through the chair - who admittedly had a difficult job, but didn't do excellently at taking hands (kept leaning over to the left side of the room) - a couple of times, but he did keep shouting "bring your tents" on the end of any and every fucking point.

Quote:
but this was also conflated with discussions around the PCS organised march and rally and members of ICC made suggestions on how we need to be engaging and communicating with strikers at that demo above and beyond the union. The result was this agreement:
J30Assembly wrote:
5. To organise a Strikers Assembly outside Westminster Hall, the end point of the trade union march on June 30th at around 1pm, for those who are picketing in central london.

This has also been supported by the assembly outside the spanish embassy and there is a meeting to discuss this further on Monday at 5.30pm. It is still an open process and I for one do NOT want to see it become some hippy peace camp ego-trip, its purpose is fundamentally trying to engage with the 10,000 trade unionists on the march in an inclusive way. Politically I have no problem with that if it works.

Me neither, good luck with it. I would say that this could possibly be yet another example of the Kick it Till it Breaks attitude of the last decade. I went to the one after the G20 March and, while it wasn't really bad per se, I recognised most of the attendees and, in that context, the speeches were in the best tradition of leftist preaching to the converted.

And of course, what happened to the planned assemblies on March 26 and Mayday?

Like I say, I honestly wish you all the best and if I'm up in Central, I'll try and come. I remain unconvinced though.

Raw wrote:
I hope you and SolFed continue with this process as I hope it can lead to something permanent in London or atleast introduce a new culture of common organising.

I thought that was supposed to be the point of ALARM? (Which you also want us to support, lest we forget.) Personally, I doubt I'll return, and neither will most of the people I was chatting to afterwards. In short, I had to rush there from a long, tiring day at work and skip dinner to sit in a stuffy, smelly room listening to self-important fulltime activists talk about shit which has no relevance to my life, my home or my job. It's hobbyist adventurism. I mean, it took me half an hour to realise that people considered "symbolism" to be a good thing! It's been a longass time since I've been in a meeting which has agreed on the importance of it, jesus! Where was the practical organising orientated towards workplaces and neighbourhoods? Don't say to me that you'd already agreed to do stuff locally in the morning, cos that's absurd tokenism and you know it!

Raw wrote:
Caiman del Barrio wrote:
EDIT also these constant references to "the Spanish movement" are ignorant to the point of prejudice. Why must all Spanish radicals - and by extension, all Spaniards in the UK - be wrapped up within this recent, rather tenuous assembly fetish that's spreading? I know of loads of Spanish radicals in London who haven't even been to the assemblies and carry on organising in their workplaces/communities or even amongst the Spanish-language scene. It's lazy and borders on identity politics to refer to a handful of Spaniards outside the Embassy as "the Spanish movement". I think it serves the interests of a handful of assembly fetishists from a secretive Trot group who are promoting this agenda.

Don't really get what you mean here. Its our "job" to engage with struggles as and when they form. Thats why we have had such a close connection with these young spanish workers ( and I've been told they seem themselves as workers not students if thats important or not ). It seems like we are damned if we do and damned if we don't.

My point is that it is lazy, journalistic reductionism to refer to this particular group of radicals - some of whom are Spanish - are "the Spanish movement". The ignorance of this is astounding: my idea of a "Spanish-flavoured assembly" involves hundreds of thousands of cenetistas in Barcelona agreeing to raid a military barracks/take over the telephone exchange, etc, in 1936! There are actually loads - hundreds maybe - of Spanish radicals in London, and many of them have very little to do with these Embassy demos. All the CNT members I know have chosen to ignore it! Now I'm not advocating non-engagement as a strategy, rather I'm pointing out that it's really ugly and borderline Orientalist to call them "the Spanish movement". Admittedly it's not as bad as the depiction of "black kids" in the recent Commune article on Stokes Croft, but still... wink

Quote:
Anyway, there are numerous strategies and points of action that groups like SolFed and others are involved with on June30th. The fact that we have them out in the open - though SolFed failed to make their proposal last monday - means we can all learn and critique what works and what doesn't. I am looking forward to post J30 meeting and see what we have learned and what can work better next time for the next round of strikes in October.

Dunno what proposal this was that we were supposed to be making, but in the spirit of cooperation and diversity, maybe you coulda promoted our Lewisham meeting over your email list alongside all the others eh? wink

raw
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Jun 12 2011 08:44
Caiman del Barrio wrote:
I recognise that the woman who said that "people are stupid" appeared to be newer. Most of the folk arguing for doing A Hitherto To Be Confirmed Massive Anarchy in the City weren't though, and you could tell that, cos the rhetoric and arguments were straight outta J18!

It really really beggars belief that some self-defined 'anarchists' still believe in this idiotic 'banker' bogeyman who's the enemy of all. The thinking seems to go something like this:

Capitalism...BAD
Capitalism...BANKER
Banker...WANKER
Banker...LIVE IN CITY
City...BAD
City...ATTACK

Its your projection caiman. The discussion was still reflective of how we generalise the strike considering that we all agreed to support early morning pickets. The question was how do we broaden this out for those that (a) won't be on strike (b) won't take the day off work - but are against the cuts and want to protest against it. It is one day and I very very much doubt anyone is thinking capitalism will come to an end on June 30th. It is still the case that our actions need to cause resonance and articulate certain messages about the link between the financialisation and austerity measures. Its an argument that still needs to be made considering that the vast majority of people are not engaged at all in fighting against cuts. There is so much we can achieve and anything we do on June 30th will be tactical. The actual work of preventing the cuts will happen on a micro-level in the various campaigns to stop closures of libraries, child services and redundancies. June 30th is a continuation of at least giving visibility to these issues and hopefully radicalising a load more people in the process.

Caiman del Barrio wrote:
This is where the contemporary anarchist 'movement' enters Home Counties Mail reader territory, with all sorts of lazy, inaccurate stereotypes coupled with an action plan that - even if their uninformed, self-parodying misunderstanding of 21st century capitalism were true - actually goes nowhere near reaching the intended targets. Like a couple of folk kept pointing out, not only does the City employ some 300,000 folk - possibly 2/3 of whom will be in menial janitorial/ancillary/technical roles, with similar job descriptions to their counterparts in the public sector - but the BASTARD BANKER STRAWMEN who you all apparently wanna target will most likely be able - and accustomed - to hotdesking, using an iPad, Blackberry, or whatever the fuck piece of shit technology's hot right now, to do so. And that's not even MENTIONING the Guantanamo-esque security system they have around the Square Mile, with automated bollards, 20/20 CCTV coverage, etc, etc...

SolFed are part of the anarchist 'movement' and you are an anarchist no? So why play this silly game of distancing yourself from it.

Caiman del Barrio wrote:
Me neither, good luck with it. I would say that this could possibly be yet another example of the Kick it Till it Breaks attitude of the last decade. I went to the one after the G20 March and, while it wasn't really bad per se, I recognised most of the attendees and, in that context, the speeches were in the best tradition of leftist preaching to the converted.

And of course, what happened to the planned assemblies on March 26 and Mayday?

Like I say, I honestly wish you all the best and if I'm up in Central, I'll try and come. I remain unconvinced though.

If this assembly is the same as Democracy Village then it will have failed massively. Though I think it will be different this time, I hope it is, as it has different people in it and as the context requires it to be different. I am concerned about some of the peoples atitudes involved in this but will participate in this to make sure it isn't so.

As for March 26 assemblies, yeah I never supported it. As for Mayday, it happened. Though we had some difficulties with our soundsystem, it happend and we around 15 or so people speaking at it - including SolFed. So not sure what your chatting about.

Caiman del Barrio wrote:
I thought that was supposed to be the point of ALARM? (Which you also want us to support, lest we forget.) Personally, I doubt I'll return, and neither will most of the people I was chatting to afterwards. In short, I had to rush there from a long, tiring day at work and skip dinner to sit in a stuffy, smelly room listening to self-important fulltime activists talk about shit which has no relevance to my life, my home or my job. It's hobbyist adventurism. I mean, it took me half an hour to realise that people considered "symbolism" to be a good thing! It's been a longass time since I've been in a meeting which has agreed on the importance of it, jesus! Where was the practical organising orientated towards workplaces and neighbourhoods? Don't say to me that you'd already agreed to do stuff locally in the morning, cos that's absurd tokenism and you know it!

And think that statement says a lot more about you than anything else. You and many others from SolFed were at the first meeting and WE agreed to support early morning pickets. So far this is happening and its clear that this is what is asked of people in the assembly. Thats why there has been meetings in local boroughs to support this. Its obvious some areas are better organised than others - Hackney & Lewisham - but there shouldn't be any excuse for not attending a picket line.

But again I don't think this is the issue with the assembly but your attitude.

Caiman del Barrio wrote:
My point is that it is lazy, journalistic reductionism to refer to this particular group of radicals - some of whom are Spanish - are "the Spanish movement". The ignorance of this is astounding: my idea of a "Spanish-flavoured assembly" involves hundreds of thousands of cenetistas in Barcelona agreeing to raid a military barracks/take over the telephone exchange, etc, in 1936! There are actually loads - hundreds maybe - of Spanish radicals in London, and many of them have very little to do with these Embassy demos. All the CNT members I know have chosen to ignore it! Now I'm not advocating non-engagement as a strategy, rather I'm pointing out that it's really ugly and borderline Orientalist to call them "the Spanish movement". Admittedly it's not as bad as the depiction of "black kids" in the recent Commune article on Stokes Croft, but still... ;)

Good grief. So the term "Spanish-flavoured assembly" should refer more to anarchists in 1936 to now??!!! And I don't think its a good thing that the CNT members in London have chosen to ignore this recent movement!!! I mean there were 700 spanish workers, students, unemployed holding an assembly in London about austerity and you think it was a good thing that none of your comrades thought to attend it! What planet are you on?!

Caiman del Barrio wrote:
Dunno what proposal this was that we were supposed to be making, but in the spirit of cooperation and diversity, maybe you coulda promoted our Lewisham meeting over your email list alongside all the others eh? ;)

Speak to your comrades in SolFed as I was told before and after the meeting ( but not during ) that SolFed had a proposal. It is not my email list, its the list of the J30 assembly that SolFed are part of. The meeting in Lewisham was publicised on the e-list, all you need to do is ask rather than complain especially as a SolFed member has access to the main june30action@gmail.com email account.

Caiman del Barrio
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Jun 12 2011 12:10
raw wrote:
Caiman del Barrio wrote:
I recognise that the woman who said that "people are stupid" appeared to be newer. Most of the folk arguing for doing A Hitherto To Be Confirmed Massive Anarchy in the City weren't though, and you could tell that, cos the rhetoric and arguments were straight outta J18!

It really really beggars belief that some self-defined 'anarchists' still believe in this idiotic 'banker' bogeyman who's the enemy of all. The thinking seems to go something like this:

Capitalism...BAD
Capitalism...BANKER
Banker...WANKER
Banker...LIVE IN CITY
City...BAD
City...ATTACK

Its your projection caiman.

Indeed, but I think it's fair one. Who are you defining as a "banker"? Why do you (apparently) consider them to be the single greatest enemy of the British working class? What's your attitude towards the massive service industry that runs parallel to the city slickers? Time was I was on pickets in E1 in support of Latin American cleaners!

Quote:
The discussion was still reflective of how we generalise the strike considering that we all agreed to support early morning pickets.

Sorry but I had the distinct impression that this was tokenism. Like i say, it'd be nice to be proved wrong but it was clear from the outset that last Monday's meeting was gonna eclipse the last one in terms of priorities. Are people really gonna be - say - at picket lines at 8am, or building for the strike in the days leading to it, or trying to generalise non-attendance for the day itself, or will they be planning their Massive Anarchy in grotesque detail?

TBF, I think the problem was the opening announcement that "we'd" agreed to have "some sort of action in the City" on the day itself. This doesn't tally with my recollection of the first meeting, although I suppose it's possible that I ignored that "agreement". I would also like to add that somehow the economic blockades proposal - which WAS universally agreed on - managed to fall off of the "agreements" of the first meeting, in favour of the contentious, divisive question of targeting the City.

Quote:
The question was how do we broaden this out for those that (a) won't be on strike (b) won't take the day off work - but are against the cuts and want to protest against it. It is one day and I very very much doubt anyone is thinking capitalism will come to an end on June 30th. It is still the case that our actions need to cause resonance and articulate certain messages about the link between the financialisation and austerity measures. Its an argument that still needs to be made considering that the vast majority of people are not engaged at all in fighting against cuts.

Right, so how does running around the City achieve this?

Quote:
There is so much we can achieve and anything we do on June 30th will be tactical. The actual work of preventing the cuts will happen on a micro-level in the various campaigns to stop closures of libraries, child services and redundancies.

Redundancies happen at workplaces right, so strikes are a pretty good tool for combating them? Moreover, that this is an anti-cuts strike (the pensions deal is clearly linked to austerity measures, and I'd imagine that a lot of strikers have been generally politicised by recent events).

And you seem to be implying that your Massive Anarchy won't actually have any effect on the cuts at all? If local campaigns are the key, why aren't the arguments being made for the weight of the Assembly to be thrown behind them, as opposed to this alienated, alienating spectacle?

As concerns local campaigns, well, it'd be good to hear of some victories. In my borough, New Cross Library has just closed down with no confirmation of any buyer willing to re-open it. Four other libraries have been transferred, with the support of around half of the service user groups (the other half being leftist anti-cuts activists). Most of the other campaigns are flat and fragmented, largely cos the energy beign inserted into them is coming from local activists who have no direct interest in the services being lost. They haven't succeeded in mobilising any large number of people, and despite there being an array of local anti-cuts groups, they are all uninspiring and narrow-minded in their approach. In retrospect, perhaps it was foolish of me to expect any different from broad left groups.

Raw wrote:
Caiman del Barrio wrote:
This is where the contemporary anarchist 'movement' enters Home Counties Mail reader territory, with all sorts of lazy, inaccurate stereotypes coupled with an action plan that - even if their uninformed, self-parodying misunderstanding of 21st century capitalism were true - actually goes nowhere near reaching the intended targets. Like a couple of folk kept pointing out, not only does the City employ some 300,000 folk - possibly 2/3 of whom will be in menial janitorial/ancillary/technical roles, with similar job descriptions to their counterparts in the public sector - but the BASTARD BANKER STRAWMEN who you all apparently wanna target will most likely be able - and accustomed - to hotdesking, using an iPad, Blackberry, or whatever the fuck piece of shit technology's hot right now, to do so. And that's not even MENTIONING the Guantanamo-esque security system they have around the Square Mile, with automated bollards, 20/20 CCTV coverage, etc, etc...

SolFed are part of the anarchist 'movement' and you are an anarchist no? So why play this silly game of distancing yourself from it.

It is precisely because I do participate in the anarchist morass (it's not a movement) that I feel entitled to criticise it.

Raw wrote:
Caiman del Barrio wrote:
Me neither, good luck with it. I would say that this could possibly be yet another example of the Kick it Till it Breaks attitude of the last decade. I went to the one after the G20 March and, while it wasn't really bad per se, I recognised most of the attendees and, in that context, the speeches were in the best tradition of leftist preaching to the converted.

And of course, what happened to the planned assemblies on March 26 and Mayday?

Like I say, I honestly wish you all the best and if I'm up in Central, I'll try and come. I remain unconvinced though.

If this assembly is the same as Democracy Village then it will have failed massively. Though I think it will be different this time, I hope it is, as it has different people in it and as the context requires it to be different. I am concerned about some of the peoples atitudes involved in this but will participate in this to make sure it isn't so.

As for March 26 assemblies, yeah I never supported it. As for Mayday, it happened. Though we had some difficulties with our soundsystem, it happend and we around 15 or so people speaking at it - including SolFed. So not sure what your chatting about.

I'm trying to critically analyse the assembly imperative, and see if anyone's learnt from their successes and failures. This is absolutely crucial, cos now assembly's become a buzzword, especially in this round of meetings you've helped to convoke. I personally haven't seen much benefit from them. I don't think they've pulled in many new people (definitely not at Mayday anyway) and I would rather leave the speechifying to the Leninists.

Raw wrote:
Caiman del Barrio wrote:
I thought that was supposed to be the point of ALARM? (Which you also want us to support, lest we forget.) Personally, I doubt I'll return, and neither will most of the people I was chatting to afterwards. In short, I had to rush there from a long, tiring day at work and skip dinner to sit in a stuffy, smelly room listening to self-important fulltime activists talk about shit which has no relevance to my life, my home or my job. It's hobbyist adventurism. I mean, it took me half an hour to realise that people considered "symbolism" to be a good thing! It's been a longass time since I've been in a meeting which has agreed on the importance of it, jesus! Where was the practical organising orientated towards workplaces and neighbourhoods? Don't say to me that you'd already agreed to do stuff locally in the morning, cos that's absurd tokenism and you know it!

But again I don't think this is the issue with the assembly but your attitude.

I've covered the picket lines/morning/pre-Massive Anarchy point already. I honestly don't feel that it will be the priority of the assemblists, the campers, or anyone else who walked outta last Monday feeling optimistic.

As concerns this being solely "my attitude", well I accept that I'm grumpy and impatient, but I don't think it's fair to pressurise people to spend 3 hours in a smelly meeting room on a weeknight discussing shit that really doesn't relate to their lives at all. Conversely, everyone I spoke to after the meeting felt that it was equally awful (not just SFers, including a couple of people with whom I don't have much in common politically), so it's not just my personal foibles.

Raw wrote:
Caiman del Barrio wrote:
My point is that it is lazy, journalistic reductionism to refer to this particular group of radicals - some of whom are Spanish - are "the Spanish movement". The ignorance of this is astounding: my idea of a "Spanish-flavoured assembly" involves hundreds of thousands of cenetistas in Barcelona agreeing to raid a military barracks/take over the telephone exchange, etc, in 1936! There are actually loads - hundreds maybe - of Spanish radicals in London, and many of them have very little to do with these Embassy demos. All the CNT members I know have chosen to ignore it! Now I'm not advocating non-engagement as a strategy, rather I'm pointing out that it's really ugly and borderline Orientalist to call them "the Spanish movement". Admittedly it's not as bad as the depiction of "black kids" in the recent Commune article on Stokes Croft, but still... ;)

Good grief. So the term "Spanish-flavoured assembly" should refer more to anarchists in 1936 to now??!!!

If you're sat in a meeting listening to one person use that term upwards of 20 times, then yes, I think it's reasonable to expect it to at least be well-applied. Calling it "the Spanish movement" is extremely ignorant. Should we call Al Qa'eda "the Saudi movement" or perhaps "the Muslim movement"?

Quote:
And I don't think its a good thing that the CNT members in London have chosen to ignore this recent movement!!! I mean there were 700 spanish workers, students, unemployed holding an assembly in London about austerity and you think it was a good thing that none of your comrades thought to attend it! What planet are you on?!

Raw go back and read what I said. I don't think it's a good thing, no.

Raw wrote:
Caiman del Barrio wrote:
Dunno what proposal this was that we were supposed to be making, but in the spirit of cooperation and diversity, maybe you coulda promoted our Lewisham meeting over your email list alongside all the others eh? ;)

Speak to your comrades in SolFed as I was told before and after the meeting ( but not during ) that SolFed had a proposal. It is not my email list, its the list of the J30 assembly that SolFed are part of. The meeting in Lewisham was publicised on the e-list, all you need to do is ask rather than complain especially as a SolFed member has access to the main june30action@gmail.com email account.

I did. No reply, no mention on the list of assemblies that they were publicising.

mons
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Jun 12 2011 21:42

Oxford strike assembly this Thursday at 7.30 at the Old Music Hall on Cowley Road.
http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=178485425543030

Also, I saw Nottingham Trades Council is organising a mass meeting of strikers from different unions, dunno how rare that it is but it seems pretty good.

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Rosa Noir
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Jun 15 2011 16:41

Any reports from the Newcastle J30 meeting last night?

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Croy
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Jun 19 2011 17:44

any one know of anything going on this day in croydon

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Alf
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Jun 25 2011 16:12

What experiences or discussions are people having at work about the strike?

The discussion forum at my college had a very interesting meeting. Less people turned up than had said they would, but still, there were about twenty of us, including two students. There were quite a few from the department Miles and I work in (learning support/ESOL), but that was good in that several of them are teaching assistants, thus not in the NUT but in UNISON, so they were directly faced with the question of what to do at the picket line - cross it or unofficially join the strike (same as those of us teachers who have chosen not to join the NUT or the ATL). We talked about the 2006 UNISON strike where the situation was reversed. Then the NUT had told its members to work normally, and only a minority decided not to cross the picket line. There was general agreement that this situation should not be repeated. People are obviously nervous about their job security (as well as about losing pay) but some of their fears were allayed because the principal of the college (who attends every open event including our forums, but I won't go into that for the moment) assured staff that no punitive action would be taken against anyone who unofficially joined the strike - they would simply lose a day's pay. There was also agreement about having another meeting on the eve of the strike. I gave a plug for the march and the attempt to hold an alternative assembly in Parliament Square.

Jason Cortez
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Jun 25 2011 17:17
Quote:
assured staff that no punitive action would be taken against anyone who unofficially joined the strike - they would simply lose a day's pay

This has been the case in a few (those I know about) schools around here. It probably reflects head's and principal's reluctance to antagonise and possibly escalate industrial action at a time of heightened worker solidarity; to be come the focus and target of the workers anger, as this personalises the issue for everyone, rather than it remaining simply government policy. And also the fact that they too are going to be losing massive amounts of money from their own pensions. So they are generally more supportive than might be the case usually.

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Steven.
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Jun 25 2011 18:57

Yeah, Jason, I think it has more to do with the fact that heads are going to lose a massive chunk of their pensions themselves!

Gove said the other day that heads have a moral duty to try to keep schools open, but some it seems are wanting to close them to defend their own pensions.

What I would do if I was the bourgeoisie would be to split headteachers off into a separate pension scheme, then cut their pensions, then a few months later cut the main teachers' one!

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Choccy
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Jun 25 2011 21:50

Our head mentioned in the 'emergency' meeting he called that he'd done quite a few days of strike action in his teaching days, so despite me being suspicious of him, it had the effect of 'normalising' talk of indstrial action to a degree.
A few of the TAs at our place have said they won't cross the picket.

The head has told people if they are sick on the day they'll have to bring medical certification but we're telling individuals if they're sick, they're sick, and can still self-certify for 5 days as normal and should not be intimidated by this as exception cannot be made for sick days that happen to coincide with industrial action of colleagues.

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Steven.
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Jun 25 2011 23:52

Choccy, somewhere like a school I would think in most instances you will be better off refusing to cross a picket line than calling in sick. As in any possible disciplinary action which results, dishonesty would count against you more than anything else

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jef costello
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Jun 26 2011 08:22
Steven. wrote:
Choccy, somewhere like a school I would think in most instances you will be better off refusing to cross a picket line than calling in sick. As in any possible disciplinary action which results, dishonesty would count against you more than anything else

I was told that you can be fired for striking if you are not in the union. In terms of protecting yourself better to call in sick than admit to a sackable offence, as long as you don't incriminate yourself they can't prove otherwise.
Obviously from a solidarity point of view it's better to have people on the pickets.