IWW, IWA, ex-IWA, and anarcho-syndicalism

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OliverTwister's picture
OliverTwister
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Jun 19 2006 02:49
IWW, IWA, ex-IWA, and anarcho-syndicalism

Right so as my fans and avid readers will have noticed, and as my new tagline shows i've recently gained much love for syndicalism. i more or less identify as a syndicalist now - its been a strange transition from platformism through left communism to syndicalism.

so i'd like to open up a little discussion on the IWW and the IWA. I don't want this to descend into an issue of John vs Gentle Revolutionary - it seems to my mind like GR has moved to put whatever issues there were into the past, but either way i hope it doesn't come into this thread.

the iww is clearly on the upswing. the north american section is transforming from an immature small wannabe revolutionary union to a somewhat more mature one with somee actualy growing workplace power. the uk section is also growing very quickly.

the iwa on the other hand, as folks have pointed out, has 2 unions which are larger than the entire iww and several natl sections bigger than the uk iww. i think they are also somewhat more theoretically advanced, in general (and they are explicitly libcom, rather than implicitly so). however they also clearly have some problems which are going to limit their future potential if they are not dealt with. Namely the 1996 splits in france and italy and the way these were/are dealt with (this is also shrouded in mystery). other things which seem problematic are the way in which WSA was excluded, as well as relationships with SAC and CGT.

Anyways i'd really like to see what other folks think about these things. I'd also like to see what other folks things about future collaboration between the IWW, IWA, CGT/SAC/CNTF/USI Rome, and other groups moving close to syndicalism.

TheWillsWilde
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Jun 19 2006 03:11

I think that the many inroads the IWW has made in the service industry will allow the uninitiated to develop class consciousness. If IWW organizers enter these contexts offering support to beleagured workers, gaining improvements for them, they should stress at the same time, the ultimate goal of collective gain and responsibility, help people envision a state where there are no speculators and profiteers, push for adaptations of the workplace that alleviate stressful and inequitable conditions. We don't walk in with a syndicalist hardline, but in the process of organizing, develop bonds with people that make them realize that a more egalitarian dispensation is possible. Having pub nights with people who are part of new campaigns, you realize that class consciousness is not so scary a prospect for people unfamiliar with the canons of revolutionary thought. It can be reassuring, the feeling of solidarity, of being part of a history, having that sense of belonging.

I believe in the army of production; I believe that people should train their minds and hearts on the libertarian communist future, and how they can adapt their workplaces, their schedules, the sharing of tasks, of knowledge and skills, to best play a role in a communist society. And not just wait for the opportunities, but fight to make them real. Every worker, everyday, imagines how things can be better, how to magnify what is good about their working experience, how to better share it. If only they had the power...which they do. The syndicates are there to remind them that they are the source, and as a class, the end of that power. To defend them. To keep pushing and pushing until we've got the whole kit. It will happen.

A friend from AK told me that too many Americans right now simply don't 'see themselves as 'working class', don't have the sense of solidarity, or the oppositional sense, either. But I know very well that once this sensibility takes root, it blooms rapidly, and is as contagious as a brushfire. You don't have to dress it up in ideology. But the revelation of a new language for our condition can help the process. I met a kid who is in IATSE last New Years, we had him over for dinner. I loaned him a copy of Rocker's Anarcho-Syndicalism, and Rebel Voices. We talked with him about revolution, about socialism, about worker's power. Now he has joined the IWW.

Still haven't got my books back tho. cry

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Jun 19 2006 09:19

The CGT, SAC, Unicobas, SUD Education (France) and various others are in a loose co-ordination called FESAL (European Federation of Alternative Unions, I think).

The IWW, through the ISC is looking at all the potentialities for work with class struggle workers organisations, including, of course the IWA. There are organisations outside both Internationals.

Although no love is lost between some sections of the IWA and FESAL affiliates (for example CNT and CGT in Spain), I don't see why the IWW shouldn't work within the broadest 'syndicalist' union family.

Personally, If I was resident in countries with AIT sections as functioning unions, I'd likley be involved in them (ie. CNT and USI) but I'd be pragmatic.

Jason Cortez
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Jun 19 2006 09:34

confused

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OliverTwister
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Jun 19 2006 14:42
Jack wrote:
This is as bad as when I thought you were going to become a Trot. :(

right so i was exaggerating a bit when i said i'm a syndicalist, for shock value.

I'm still really platform-influenced, just have realized that it was more of a critical trend within syndicalism (the friends of durruti too). Its like how you said you'd join Organize! if you could, same here...

petey
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Jun 19 2006 15:51
Jack wrote:
This is as bad as when I thought you were going to become a Trot. :(

hmmm. doesn't like syndicalism, doesn't like connolly.

puppies? do you hate them too?

seriously (though hating puppies is a pretty serious business), i'd like some more info on the US history with the IWA. can't find much on the web. oliver? anyone?

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Jun 19 2006 16:12

I think AS is the only viable way of putting liberatarian politics in practice across the spectrum, as long as we are honest about the hard work ahead we have some potential for growth in the meduim to long term. AS is about working with others on an equal basis without being submerged into theoritical sparring or lifestylism and is a valid tool for developing militant workers, but I think all organisations will need to meet the grade and I dont think any do at this moment in time. Greater organisation and co-ordination are needed.

1996 splits and all that, well, I dont know too much of recent history but I dont think the IWA and its sections are claiming to be the only group out there, when groups are quite small they do have a tendency to pontificate over theory and I think some people in the smaller sections talk ample even when they might not know the compromises a genuine class struggle might throw up. Some people may get it wrong, as long as there is no class colloboration all groups should work together possibly with the idea of joining in the long run.

As to the IWW, I cant claim to understand its purpose, to me it seems strangely apolitical. Although its small at this stage I think the starting point as to be getting SF off the ground.

Regards

red n black star

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Jun 19 2006 16:26

I'm getting that same groove Oliver, the syndicalist feeling - must be all the Spanish Civil War propaganda we've been receiving this anniversary.

But seriously, a 'brand' like the IWW with a flexible and basic libertarian basis seems to have a potential to (really) radicalise and act as an alternative to traditional unionism. It's something you can offer to people, that they can be part of and which has many of the 'conveniences' of unionism (being a 'union' for a start), but of course could go so much further. It's appears almost separate and defined from the usual vagueness of libertarian workplace organisation (ie. councils etc. which I'll always be behind, with syndicalism or not but which always appears as a non-starter).

There's absolutely nothing contradictory with being platform-inspired and working in a radical union; the original 'Platformists' and present day top-notch Anarchist Communists all advocate it as a strategy. What's important is that we only see it as a strategy, that we're clear on the critique of unions in a revolutionary context and that we've got no bloody qualms in disregarding its decisions, its existence if we see fit! In other words, not getting wrapped up in the organisation per se.

Plus if we were to flood it with enough anarchists we can just add 'libertarian communism' to the preamble and make it the CNT of the UK! Oh, please.

Anyway, it's got my anti-union, ultra-left support. The only reason I'm not in it is because I'm a silly student and I don't really produce anything of value.

Probably never will, either. 8)

TheWillsWilde
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Jun 19 2006 16:27
Quote:
seriously (though hating puppies is a pretty serious business), i'd like some more info on the US history with the IWA. can't find much on the web. oliver? anyone?

All I know is that the IWW has pondered the possibility of affiliating with the IWA, a couple of times, i believe, and has voted against it.

I once talked with an ex-branch secretary of the IWW about some sort of IWA conference in America, semi-recently, very small, I don't think anything came of it, but I don't retain the whole exchange. I too am curious about the IWA in America. I may be wrong, but I believe that in Mexico, way back, ihe IWW lost a lot of people to the IW(m?)A. More details in the last issue of ASR, which i can't find right now.

Today, yet another shop in Berkeley is going public. I can be more specific when the press release is out.

Quote:

Anyway, it's got my anti-union, ultra-left support. The only reason I'm not in it is because I'm a silly student and I don't really produce anything of value.

Students are welcome in the IWW as 'apprentice workers', have been for a while. IWW+SDS+"Poverty of Student Life'= a rennaissance of student rebellion in the U.S.

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Jun 19 2006 16:36

Newyawka i can't help too much. I'm well acquainted with one of the members of WSA. The basic story, as far as i can tell, is that a small group in minnesota joined WSA. They were working in a factory owned by a company which the USI were on strike against, and sincce they were the only group doing actual workplace activity they were elected to all the national positions. Then they started expelling everyone, changed the name to AIT-USA, and so on. When the WSA reconstituted itseelf the Norwegians in the IWA, (and maybe the spanish?) said that there was no longer any us section and that the WSA would need to re-apply. That's all that I know - the WSA forum in the north american section has dissappeared but if the mods get it back up i'm sure you can ask - or ask "David in Atlanta" or "Mitch". Hopefully they'll come onto this thread.

October_Lost, i've read some stuff from the IWA secretariat yelling about the "parallelist" activities of the SAC, CNT-F, CGT, and which the IWW has been implicated in. Allow me to predict that if that attitude remains the predominate one the IWA will not grow much in the future.

A little more about problems within the IWA - my understanding of the 1996 expulsions is that only two organizations, the CNT and NSF voted to expel the CNT-F and USI rome. However the CNT-F, at least, i know do not recognize the expulsions and still consider themselves to be part of the IWA (an external fraction, perhaps?). In addition, the rest of the USI which remains in the AIT, have thrown down the gauntlet that if small party-like organizations are allowed to remain in the AIT (with an equal vote to organizations encommpasing thousands of members!) past the next congress, then they will leave. However like i said, information about these matters is not really forthcoming, and I don't want to be talking empty shit if it can be avoided...

Volin I reccently came to the conclusion that most platformists in north america are in the IWW. I think the IWW joining the IWA would not be a bad idea at all, if it can be demonstrated that the IWA has its shit together. Certainly, it would be good to give a higher emphasis to 'libertarian communism' in the IWW!

Wills, the IWW did vote to join the IWA in 89 or 90. There was some controversy because the WSA was already the US section. Also at one point there were seeveral WSA members in the San Francisco branch of the IWW who organized I-99, which gathered many syndicalist organizations, IWA and not, in San Francisco.

TheWillsWilde
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Jun 19 2006 16:38

So did we join as 'friends' or as full affiliates? Someone steered me wrong on this. By the way I've read Guillamon's book on the FOD, it's fascinating.

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Jun 19 2006 16:47

I believe there was a succeessful vote to join as full affiliates but this did not go through because there was some controversy, and it was not pursued...

I wonder if we would have been expelled? tongue

TheWillsWilde
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Jun 19 2006 16:53

It's funny because on another thread you jokingly intimated that the IWA should join the IWW, not vice versa, which is something I had thought about.

I find the expulsions distasteful, the result of purism. I don't understand all the issues, and don't advocate a false unity or synthesis, but I would like to see more harmony, that's all.

Perhaps I can learn more about all this at the GA. If I thought myself in a position to put anything on the agenda, I would reccomend that atleast a quarter of the Industrial Worker's budget should go to a Spanish translation. I think it is absolutely essential. Me and the wife have made a prop brochure which is being translated, its getting good response.

I think that the more crossover membership there is between orgs, the better.

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Jun 19 2006 17:06

I honestly don't think that the IWW will be joining the IWA. While most of the wobs on this board are anarchists there are still a lot of us with other political loyalties. For instance I know that a lot of the people in Portland are socialist party folks, as well I don't think Mark Damron our current GST is an anarchist either.

All that aside, while I really like the IWA it seems they very much have their own thing going on and aren't really open to affiliating with groups with different politics. I would be much more interested in looking at working with groups like the COBAS, SAC and CGT just because they aren't as ideologicaly stringent while trying to maintain good relations with the IWA.

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Jun 19 2006 17:11

hmm my thoughts have changed a lot sincee that thread. on syndicalism and platformism i think i'm pretty close to Revol now. in other words i don't think the model of a democratic union which is animated by a platformist minority is the best way (it is a little too mechanical in my mind). There was a great black flag article saying that this controversy was all due to the contradiction between libertarian reformists and semi-vanguardists - however there's noo doubt in my mind that if its true that only two organizations voted in the decision to expel thousands of members from the French and Italian sections, then it could have been handled a lot better...

(PS there are efforts to set up a group which will produce a spanish-language IWW bulletin. I think if we can get that working then it might be a good idea to throw money at us, but not before).

TheWillsWilde
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Jun 19 2006 17:15

If there is a coherent proposal, I'd love to read it.

The IWW is very tentatively making inroads with day laborers (jornaleros) in the bay. My brochure has a strong internationalist strain to it, many of the Amersino workers are undocumented. It is an obvious path. A Chinese bulletin would be cool to, but I have no idea how it would be recieved.

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Rob Ray
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Jun 19 2006 17:53

(edit: That's revol standing up for fluffy animals everywhere against the might of Jack's disdain)

Deezer
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Jun 19 2006 20:47
OliverTwister wrote:
however they also clearly have some problems which are going to limit their future potential if they are not dealt with. Namely the 1996 splits in france and italy and the way these were/are dealt with (this is also shrouded in mystery). other things which seem problematic are the way in which WSA was excluded, as well as relationships with SAC and CGT.

I'd like to deal with just one of these points, the 1996 Italian split. Both the French and Italian splits had happened before the Congress (that an earlier incarnation of Organise! affiliated to the AIT at - this like that incarnation of Organise! post 1996 was to be pretty short lived). What happened at the Congress regarding the French and Italian splits were very different, and I'm speaking from recollection as a delegate from Organise! at that time. Both Italian sections agreed that they would have no decision making input into the Congress until the issue of which section in the split would be recognised as the IWA affiliate was sorted.

The section who were to go on to leave the IWA addressed the Congress first - their speaker, who apparently had heart trouble, was very abrassive from the start and shouted a lot in his address - this led to problems with the simultaneous translations into English, German and Spanish and the hired (AFAIR) translators asked that the speaker slow down to allow them to translate on more than one occassion. This seemed to be regarded as attempt to interupt and silence what was being said and after a pretty bizarre outburst the delegates for that section of the USI declared it was all over and left the IWA throwing their delegate cards at the platform. The fact is they clearly left the IWA themselves without any of the sections having any input into a discussion on the situation regarding the Italian split let alone being in the position to vote on the expulsion of one section or other of the split.

It seems to me that after taking this course of action the delegates returned to their section to find that they had no mandate to leave the IWA and in their press went on to claim they were still the Italian IWA section and that they'd been unfairly excluded/expelled - this is balls, their delegates walked out of the IWA.

I know thats just one of the issues you asked about, if anyone else who may have been there remembers this any differently fire away.

Cheers;

circle A red n black star

syndicalist
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Jun 21 2006 04:19

Been a long hot day, so this will be brief.

I'm not a member of the IWW and respect their autonomy. So I think it would be out of line for me to comment on their current situation or internal discussions.

I think there's really a few levels of conversation here, ranging from historical to tatical.

I thought Oliver made a good attenpt to summerize the historical stuff, but found it somewhat off. As I've been in and around the anarcho-syndicalist movement (and IWA) since the 1970s, I'll try and clarifiy, fill in and smooth out parts of Oliver's historical comments.

More later, it's past midnite and I'm dog tired.

syndicalist
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Jun 21 2006 04:40
Quote:
for that section of the USI declared it was all over and left the IWA throwing their delegate cards at the platform. The fact is they clearly left the IWA themselves without any of the sections having any input into a discussion on the situation regarding the Italian split let alone being in the position to vote on the expulsion of one section or other of the split.

It seems to me that after taking this course of action the delegates returned to their section to find that they had no mandate to leave the IWA and in their press went on to claim they were still the Italian IWA section and that they'd been unfairly excluded/expelled - this is balls, their delegates walked out of the IWA.

circle A red n black star

Ok, one comment tonite...

I wasn't at this Congress, but a WSA delegate was. I'm sure that the former Organise! comrades recollection is on target. In addition to this, it is my understanding that the "USI-Roma" walkied out in solidarity with what is now commonly refered to "CNT_Vignoles" (as in rude des Vignoles, the street where the CNT is HQ'd in Paris).

It is my understanding that "USI-Roma" walked out because they were "tatctically" in ageeement with "CNT-Vignoles". That is, they shared a tactical agreement in their union work.

Lastly, if memory serves me correctly, CNT-AIT (Spain), NSF (norway) and "CNT-Bourdeaux" all voted in favor of exclusion. All others (probably triple this number) voted to abstain. As the IWA has a simple "Yes" or "No" voting proceedure the 3 yes votes (a minority of all present) carried the day.

As the whole issue was so very charged and on-going (I think nearly 3-4 years in France) perhaps the wisest thing to do (given so many abstentions) was to continue the discussion. I understand the frustration that this would have caused and perhaps the outcome may resulted in some form of censure or explusion. At least there would be a clear majority. But to have so many out there without a mandate or clear picture, created a sort of power block of a few.

I know within the WSA we were split right down the middle on the question. Literally. We choose to abstain on the "french question" to maintain our own unity. Perhaps there were others in similiar circumstances. Perhaps others simply had a hard time with the tons of documents, all in french (not a criticism, an observation). Perhaps others simply wanted to sit the fight out.

Ok, that's it for now.

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Jun 21 2006 12:05

thanks syndicalist, thats probably the best description of the events i have so far seen!

Shame it has turned so sour afterwards... sad

Deezer
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Jun 21 2006 12:46
syndicalist wrote:
Quote:
for that section of the USI declared it was all over and left the IWA throwing their delegate cards at the platform. The fact is they clearly left the IWA themselves without any of the sections having any input into a discussion on the situation regarding the Italian split let alone being in the position to vote on the expulsion of one section or other of the split.

It seems to me that after taking this course of action the delegates returned to their section to find that they had no mandate to leave the IWA and in their press went on to claim they were still the Italian IWA section and that they'd been unfairly excluded/expelled - this is balls, their delegates walked out of the IWA.

circle A red n black star

Ok, one comment tonite...

I wasn't at this Congress, but a WSA delegate was. I'm sure that the former Organise! comrades recollection is on target. In addition to this, it is my understanding that the "USI-Roma" walkied out in solidarity with what is now commonly refered to "CNT_Vignoles" (as in rude des Vignoles, the street where the CNT is HQ'd in Paris).

It is my understanding that "USI-Roma" walked out because they were "tatctically" in ageeement with "CNT-Vignoles". That is, they shared a tactical agreement in their union work.

Lastly, if memory serves me correctly, CNT-AIT (Spain), NSF (norway) and "CNT-Bourdeaux" all voted in favor of exclusion. All others (probably triple this number) voted to abstain. As the IWA has a simple "Yes" or "No" voting proceedure the 3 yes votes (a minority of all present) carried the day.

As the whole issue was so very charged and on-going (I think nearly 3-4 years in France) perhaps the wisest thing to do (given so many abstentions) was to continue the discussion. I understand the frustration that this would have caused and perhaps the outcome may resulted in some form of censure or explusion. At least there would be a clear majority. But to have so many out there without a mandate or clear picture, created a sort of power block of a few.

I know within the WSA we were split right down the middle on the question. Literally. We choose to abstain on the "french question" to maintain our own unity. Perhaps there were others in similiar circumstances. Perhaps others simply had a hard time with the tons of documents, all in french (not a criticism, an observation). Perhaps others simply wanted to sit the fight out.

Ok, that's it for now.

Not sure about the walking out in solidarity with Vignoles, there seemed to be other issues with USI-Roma that weren't related to the French situation, also I really don't remember if the French situation came up before or after the USI-Roma walked out (anyone remember?). Even if they did it still appears that when they got home USI-Roma found that they'd no mandate to walk out.

Just to clarify the exclusion voted on was in relation to the CNT Vignoles, there may have been a vote to ratify the remaining Italian section as the affiliate after Roma walked out, again I don't recall, but AFAIR there was no vote on exclusion cos Roma excluded themselves. The vote on the French split, the number of abstentions and the minority of votes (even if they were the majority of votes cast) carrying this decision was appalling and this decision making process clearly isn't up to dealing with issues like this one. But then again given yer imo pretty spot on surmising of various sections motives for abstaining would it possibly have gone any better even after more prolonged discussion?

In solidarity;

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OliverTwister
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Jun 21 2006 16:50

Also is it true that Vignoles called for the weapons embargo on Bosnia to be lifted?

Big Brother
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Jun 21 2006 17:00

Something to cheer the hearty sole. 8)

http://www.indymedia.org.uk/en/2006/06/343188.html

Is the IWW, IWA an Equivalent to the Spanish CNT?

syndicalist
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Jun 22 2006 03:01
OliverTwister wrote:
Also is it true that Vignoles called for the weapons embargo on Bosnia to be lifted?

As I recall, this was an accusation made against Vignoles by folks, I think, from Bourdeaux. But I'm not sure if I've ever seen documentation on this.

I do recall that there was a criticism of IWA members participating, along with the Swedish SAC, in "Workers Aid to Bosnia" (or something like that).

Speciifc t the question, I'd have to see if there's anything on file documenting this claim against Vignoles. Perhaps the Organise comrade may recal.

syndicalist
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Jun 22 2006 03:26
Quote:
Not sure about the walking out in solidarity with Vignoles, there seemed to be other issues with USI-Roma that weren't related to the French situation, also I really don't remember if the French situation came up before or after the USI-Roma walked out (anyone remember?). Even if they did it still appears that when they got home USI-Roma found that they'd no mandate to walk out.

Just to clarify the exclusion voted on was in relation to the CNT Vignoles, there may have been a vote to ratify the remaining Italian section as the affiliate after Roma walked out, again I don't recall, but AFAIR there was no vote on exclusion cos Roma excluded themselves. The vote on the French split, the number of abstentions and the minority of votes (even if they were the majority of votes cast) carrying this decision was appalling and this decision making process clearly isn't up to dealing with issues like this one. But then again given yer imo pretty spot on surmising of various sections motives for abstaining would it possibly have gone any better even after more prolonged discussion?

In solidarity;

circle A red n black star

I agree that Roma excluded themselves. No question about that.

In regards to other issues, yes, but it, as I recall, was all related to wheher or not IWA unions should participate in government sanctioned labor bodies. So the question of tactics can be intertwined between Vignoles and Roma. Ironically, the affiliated USI is currently getting raked over the coals for its participation in workplace committees (RSU).

As to whether or not further discussionwould have changed the outcome of things, perhaps not. I will say, however, that what occured in 1996 has had a profound impact on the IWA from that time forward. I think that the cast was molded to allow for a certian method and mindset to prevail.

Of course, part of the problem with taking a "time out" on any question that could only be voted on at a Congress was the frequency of Congresses. At that time they were every 4 years, with plenaries in-between. This is problematic in so much as it creates a certain inflexibility with dealing with issues.

In my own opinion, with so many abstentions, perhaps a special arrangment could be made. That is, some more discussion and then a specical conference to vote on the matter. If an additional conference was held, and the votes were substaintial for expulsion, it would clearly signify that an important question was deceided by a clear minority. Even if the final vote would be in favor of censure or explusion, at least it would have had a majority position. I mean 3 out of 16 Sections and Friends is kinda imbalanced for a libertarian organization. It says that the question--for a majority--was not black and white at that Congress.

Deezer
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Jun 22 2006 08:13

Yeah, couldn't agree more. Well actually I have reservations about "the cast was molded to allow for a certian method and mindset to prevail" I mean I know what ye mean but I don't see this as being universally applicable to the sections of the IWA. I understand that this view will undoubtedly have been reinforced given the outcome of the WSAs dispute at that level.

In relation to yer point on the USI, I'm pretty much against participation in government sponsored works councils - how that translates into disputes over tactics and the amount of tactical coherance the IWA demands on such issues is of course a different discussion to one on the problems talked about so far on how these disputes have been dealt with.

Your suggestion for special conferences between Congresses to deal with specific cases is something I reckon the IWA should take on board.

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Jun 22 2006 08:54

So can I ask, with the French CNT what happened, did it split into CNT-Vignoles and CNT-AIT before Congress? And did both send delegates? Or did the CNT-V get expelled then some members split from it to form CNT-AIT in order to get back into the IWA?

martinh
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Jun 22 2006 10:05

The CNT split before the Congress.

Regards,

Martin

syndicalist
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Jun 22 2006 13:07
Boulcolonialboy wrote:
Yeah, couldn't agree more. Well actually I have reservations about "the cast was molded to allow for a certian method and mindset to prevail" I mean I know what ye mean but I don't see this as being universally applicable to the sections of the IWA. I understand that this view will undoubtedly have been reinforced given the outcome of the WSAs dispute at that level.

circle A red n black star

I agree that each IWA Section has dealt with things in different ways. I think the current case with the USI is being handled a bit more delicately than it would've in the past. The constant pounding on the (growing) FAU is another issue.

As far as the WSA goes, well, I will reserve judgement. I know that there's some who simply say to WSA "reapply" (and, in essence to forget the past). Probably a real test of solidarity will be when some in the IWA say, hmmm, let's re-examine how we related to the WSA in Granada and the period beyond. Until something like this happens, I'm suspect of how such an inportant organization like the IWA can effectively deal with internal issues.

Look, I've been a strong and unwavering supporter of the IWA since the 1970s. We worked our tails off for the IWA. I still believe in the Principles of the IWA. I still have comrades who are part of the IWA. But the IWA has a serious problem in the way it deals with certain issues. So whatever happened to the WSA can happen to others.

OliverTwister's picture
OliverTwister
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Joined: 10-10-05
Jun 22 2006 20:38

Also has anything come of the plans the IWA made to publish a magazine in Spanish and English? I'd be extremely interested to see that.