Corsica-Marseilles

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redtwister
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Oct 5 2005 19:19
Corsica-Marseilles

At the moment of writing (29th September 05) in Marseille, and in Corsica, there's a mini-insurrection over privatisation and redundancies. A few sporadic mini-barricades are going up over Marseille and at Bastia in Corsica, some small burning obstacles here and there on and off all over the place over the last 48 hours, trucks chucked in the harbour, some riot cops pelted with stones, a blockade of the two ports, solidarity strikes with dockers and petrol refineries coming out in support of the ferrrymen sailors theatened with privatisation - 40 of whom hijacked (unarmed) a massive ferry ship, a virtual mutiny, and took it to Corsica where it was intercepted by three French navy ships, helicopters and armed masked French soldiers, arresting them all but holding only 4 of them after demonstrations of solidarity with them in Marseille and Corsica. Are these 'theoretical' holders of the perfect critique down in Marseille scrawling on the walls, 'Privatisation is irrelevant! Here is the true slogan of struggle "Down with the commodity economy!" ' Those who realise that theory is a practical matter might begin to respect them a little if they at least dared to do this, however simplistic the content, but they're above such 'activism'. The few practical movements contesting this world certainly need to develop 'theory' - a consciousness of the immensity of their tasks. But then the few theoretical attempts at contesting this world need to develop practise. Apparently though, this hardly novel banality is beyond the purists.

A few additional facts concerning the situation now in Corsica (Sept.30th):

The whole island is now blockaded, because the airline workers have now come out on strike in solidarity, and because nothing is getting into or leaving Marseille. Workers in Corsica held the Town Hall under siege, occupying it, until the last remaining sailors arrested for the mutiny were released, which happened the evening of September 30th, though the charges - which carry a maximum of twenty years inside - haven't been dropped. This might be a bit of a setback for the French State's project of Thatcherising the country, and may hopefully be an encouragement to further subversive initiatives. The word "Freedom" in Corsican has been rapidly painted onto banners, whilst the Corsican nationalists are clearly trying to represent this movement even though workers on mainland France have also been at the centre of things. The "Chamber of Commerce", a state enterprise that deals with the bureaucracy of businesses, has also been briefly blockaded. A terrorist rocket attack on one of the "Prefectures" (administrative building) - in Ajaccio - led to workers to put up banners saying "Terrorists - No! Workers - Yes!" and even a politician said the terrorist attack (in which, by chance, no-one was hurt) was an attempt to distract from the events on the island (one could have added "and in Marseille"), though he didn't say whether he thought it was the French State or Corsican nationalists who wanted to do the distracting. Meanwhile, de Villepin, the P.M., deliberately connected the terrorist attack with the unarmed mutiny, saying they were equally horrifying (though clearly, the mutiny was far more horrifying for him and his class). On the evening of 1st October, after the riot cops had managed to get rid of the blockade of the ports (Marseille, however, remaining totally blocked), mini-riots of a few hundred youths attacking the riot cops, erupted in Bastia and Ajaccio (the main port towns of the island), whilst a Customs boat was severely damaged by a small explosive device (no-one hurt). Who says the proletariat is definitively integrated (whilst pretending that they are not)? Sure this is France, and amongst many there's almost a jaded complacency that these kinds of eruptions will continue unabated as they have done, on and off, for the last 216 years. But then in the 80s in the UK there was a similar feeling. But who can tell? Precisely because the State does want to reverse this historical and living memory, and precisely because the resistance to this still sporadically explodes in its face, it seems really possible that in France the clashes will be particularly intense. Watch this space for updates (latest update 0ctober 3rd).

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Steven.
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Oct 5 2005 23:49

It's very interesting stuff, that's true...

shakeitup
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Oct 6 2005 21:12

Yeah, good, thanks

Nick Durie
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Oct 7 2005 10:54

So what do we do about it?

Vaneigemappreci...
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Oct 7 2005 11:31

whats the latest redtwister? I might pop back that way on my way back to blighty if the situation is still in progress

Lazlo_Woodbine
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Oct 7 2005 13:30
Nick Durie wrote:
So what do we do about it?

We can't always 'do something' about every issue that pops up.

Bloody activist mentality roll eyes

Mr. T

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Steven.
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Oct 7 2005 13:41
Nick Durie wrote:
So what do we do about it?

Think "oh that's neat"

Then maybe look at what happens, what both sides do, then learn from it?

Or I spose you could put a Cafe Rouge's windows in. Fucking frenchies angry black bloc

redtwister
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Oct 7 2005 14:07

Do? Well, from the East Coast of the U.S., I can do fuck all i suppose, except spread the word and hope that some of you with French ot Italian comrades might pass this on (or that some French or Italians might lurk in the background here), if they do not know about it, and hopefully it circulates its way around to people who can do something, as well as being important in itself to let people know that other people are fighting. I would rather take this to a picket line to find a way to make people feel less isolated than some programmatic leaflet.

Circulation of struggles, 'rades, circulation of struggles...

Cheers,

Chris