zapatistas!

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vicent
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Joined: 21-03-13
Jun 24 2013 01:41
zapatistas!

hello ive read a bit about the zapatistas but it most often centres on the struggle with the mexican government so i have a few questions if anyone can answer them

do the zapatistas operate on an anarchist structure? how many are there? what is their quality of life? what are some recent developments?

thankyou!

Tamzir's picture
Tamzir
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Joined: 23-06-13
Jun 30 2013 08:00

Hi there

Anything you want to know about Zapatista's you can begin with John Holloway's book, Change the world without taking power, which is available online on this site, in the library section. It gives you a bit of background on the movment, but check the index and notes on further reading - it's a place to start.

Hope that helps

Trev (in the UK)

vicent
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Joined: 21-03-13
Jun 30 2013 10:21

thanks!

vicent
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Jul 7 2013 12:26

well they seem like the real deal, is it possible to visit them ?

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Felix Frost
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Joined: 30-12-05
Jul 7 2013 19:17

It is possible to visit Zapatista communities. If you are interested, you should contact your nearest Zapatsta solidarity group.

They also have a language school, if you don't speak good Spanish:
http://www.mexicosolidarity.org/programs/oventiclanguageschool

vicent
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Jul 8 2013 07:07

thanks !
great it should be a pilgrimage! i thought they spoke Tzotil ?

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GerryK
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Apr 10 2015 16:03
Quote:
it’s been known for 5 years at least that Marcos and co. are another protection racket, more all-embracing than most. Take what an Australian woman said of the ’96 encuentros: “… the women doing all the cooking and cleaning, including of toilets, invariably without any footwear (the men had the boots), even after heavy rainfall…Harry Cleaver said “Well, maybe they like it…”…the workshops organised like a bourgeois University – compartmentalised into separate categories like ‘Indigenous Culture’, ‘Politics’, ‘Economics’ etc.…the impossibility of questioning anything openly in the meetings…” She then went on to describe how, when Marcos gave the red carpet treatment to a French journalist who’d just recently slagged off and lied about a wave of strikes in the public sector, a total bourgeois whom Marcos welcomed into his open arms and treated with far greater respect than the vast majority of the French contingent (who, for example, were forced along with lots of others, to endure, without shade, a 2 or 3 hour wait in the scorching shadeless midday sun), the French contingent, the biggest contingent there, revolted a little, and presented Marcos with a letter objecting to this complicity, an insult to the movement in France. A meeting was arranged to discuss this in the middle of the forest at night, in the pouring rain. After some wait, Marcos rode up on horseback with his entourage and, giving a monologue lecture, withdrew the letter from his coat and proceeded to contemptuously read it in a dull monotone (a crude contrast with his normal dramatic poetic style) to the gathering below him, at the end throwing the drenched letter into the mud below, saying “Well, politics forces us sometimes to meet with our enemies”, which says how little this movement embodies a critique of politics. At least one of the French critics was woken up in the middle of the night, ordered out of his tent and was confronted by a few armed Zapatistas, who abused him verbally for his lack of submissive respect for his hosts. Coupled with Marcos’ star treatment of Mme.Mitterand, an even worse bourgeois scum, this seriously dented the illusions of the less ideological participants in the French contingent.

- from "Mexico - a compilation"