Wildcat strikes everywhere

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Steven.'s picture
Steven.
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Mar 14 2007 15:25
Wildcat strikes everywhere

Don't know if everyone here reads our news - do you?

But there have been loads of wildcat strikes this month all over the place. We've just covered two more - of thousands of manufacturing workers in Vietnam, and car workers in India:
http://libcom.org/news/tags/wildcat%20strikes

Does anyone know if there are stats collected anywhere on unofficial action?

Joseph Kay's picture
Joseph Kay
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Mar 14 2007 15:27

i think there's a database, which beverley silver used for her book. dunno who maintains it and if it includes wildcats though.

ftony
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Mar 14 2007 15:41

the ILO has data on 'work stoppages' i think, so if you can find the number of official strike and subtract that from the total work stoppages then that'd be about right. i would offer to do it but i am too busy.

.... okayokay i am too lazy wink

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Jacques Roux
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Mar 14 2007 15:59
Quote:
* LABORSTA table 9A - Strikes and lockouts by economic activity
* LABORSTA table 9B - Workers involved in strikes and lockouts by economic activity
* LABORSTA table 9C - Days not worked in strikes and lockouts by economic activity
* LABORSTA table 9C - Rates of days not worked in strikes and lockouts by economic activity

http://laborsta.ilo.org/

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Red Marriott
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Mar 15 2007 22:38

I e-mailed the link John provided to a few people and one person made some interesting comments;

Quote:
I guess this is mostly the new working class emerging in
'developing" regions. The strikes in the West seem mostly to be in the last
vestiges of traditional labour. What isn't emerging - or at least
isn't being reported - is any rebellion in the new post-industrial
economy of de-unionised and casualised service industry labour. That
said, yes it is a cause for optimism and also these new working
classes have everything to learn from what happened in Europe and the
US in the 20th Century so have a huge wealth of theory and practice,
success and failure to work from. They are also emerging post-cold
war so will hopefully take on a new dynamic free of the statist-
leftist trappings that hindered the movements in Europe. The next
Durruti or Debord is more likely to be Indian or Chinese than Spanish
or French and that is really quite bloody exciting....

If the new workers of the developing regions are able to learn from the past mistakes of the Western workers' movements - and us learn from them - then resources like libcom could be quite important in that respect. Though so far there are almost no site visitors from e.g. Asia, iirc?

thugarchist's picture
thugarchist
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Mar 15 2007 22:53
rkn wrote:
Quote:
* LABORSTA table 9A - Strikes and lockouts by economic activity
* LABORSTA table 9B - Workers involved in strikes and lockouts by economic activity
* LABORSTA table 9C - Days not worked in strikes and lockouts by economic activity
* LABORSTA table 9C - Rates of days not worked in strikes and lockouts by economic activity

http://laborsta.ilo.org/

But they get the stats from government reporting right? If so those numbers are fairly maleable. Several years ago the U.S. stopped "noticing" strikes of less than 1000 workers for example. Flint would be a good person to ask as he tracks that kind of stuff for a living.

Mike Harman
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Joined: 7-02-06
Mar 15 2007 23:09
Ret Marut wrote:
If the new workers of the developing regions are able to learn from the past mistakes of the Western workers' movements - and us learn from them - then resources like libcom could be quite important in that respect. Though so far there are almost no site visitors from e.g. Asia, iirc?

Very little, our stats recording has been a bit inconsistent, just got server-side ones working again though after months of not having them.

In the past 24 hours we've had:

countries/pages

Mexico/156
Brazil/41
India/22
Singapore/19
Malaysia/19
China/16

Those are statistically insignificant compared to 12k for .com 9k for .net 7k for .uk, and I don't really trust the geographical accuracy of these kinds of stats programmes. If I remember I'll try to update in a month's time.

So basically we do get a little bit of traffic, but it's very little. Devrim reckoned there was a lot of interest in his group from other people in Turkey generated from here though (40 contacts or something?), so it might be more than is obvious from reading the forums.

Steven.'s picture
Steven.
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Joined: 27-06-06
Mar 16 2007 01:59
Ret Marut wrote:
I e-mailed the link John provided to a few people and one person made some interesting comments;

Quote:
I guess this is mostly the new working class emerging in
'developing" regions. The strikes in the West seem mostly to be in the last
vestiges of traditional labour. What isn't emerging - or at least
isn't being reported - is any rebellion in the new post-industrial
economy of de-unionised and casualised service industry labour. That
said, yes it is a cause for optimism and also these new working
classes have everything to learn from what happened in Europe and the
US in the 20th Century so have a huge wealth of theory and practice,
success and failure to work from. They are also emerging post-cold
war so will hopefully take on a new dynamic free of the statist-
leftist trappings that hindered the movements in Europe. The next
Durruti or Debord is more likely to be Indian or Chinese than Spanish
or French and that is really quite bloody exciting....

If the new workers of the developing regions are able to learn from the past mistakes of the Western workers' movements - and us learn from them - then resources like libcom could be quite important in that respect. Though so far there are almost no site visitors from e.g. Asia, iirc?

Hmmm well a lot of the wildcat strikes we've been reporting have been from the west, in traditional vestiges of working class power - mostly transport, rail, manufacturing, etc. But yeah a lot from the developing world too.

Net access there is of course much worse than here - for now anyway - but I know there's one guy who reads here on occasion anyway who is from Europe, but will probably be working in an Indian call centre again soon. He wrote this.

Feighnt
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Joined: 20-07-06
Mar 16 2007 06:47

another factor, of course, is that most of the stuff written up here is in english... it'd be quite a problem to tackle for, say, someone who only speaks hindi, or mandarin, or etc.

Mike Harman
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Mar 16 2007 09:26
Feighnt wrote:
another factor, of course, is that most of the stuff written up here is in english... it'd be quite a problem to tackle for, say, someone who only speaks hindi, or mandarin, or etc.

Yeah that's the biggest issue really apart from net access. The closest we got to getting over that was when large excerpts from the CPE blog were translated into Farsi, (and Swedish , and I think Greek and German as well) - and of course most of the blog was itself translations. There's other examples of things being translated for the site (or via contacts made on the site for pamphlets etc.), but it's probably less than 50 out of c.7,000 articles.

With a bit of luck, on-line translation tools will come on a lot in the next few years, and we'll be able to have a "translate this page" (itself translated into whatever language the browser identifies itself as via i8n) link on every page that leads to something that isn't complete rubbish. Manual translations are great, but in any volume it's only going to be during particular events I think unless it's within international organisational structures (that are unlikely to reach India, Iran, China, Bangladesh, South Korea etc. anyway).

bastarx
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Joined: 9-03-06
Mar 19 2007 23:59
Quote:
i think there's a database, which beverley silver used for her book. dunno who maintains it and if it includes wildcats though.

IIRC from reading "Forces of Labour" 3 years ago, Silver and her colleagues/students went through the last 100 odd years of indexs of the New York Times and The Times (London) looking for mentions of strikes. I'm not sure if they've kept that work up or made it publicly available.