More kids being alternatively schooled

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stella
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Feb 27 2008 16:29

I have been homeschooling for 10 years now, and I don't consider myself a hippie, religious freak, or any other stereotype.
I've homeschooled five well turned out kids who love wrestling, football, mixing with friends, barbie dolls, and all manner of things.
The quality time i've spent with my own children has been invaluable.Time I've been forced to spend with them, but have also enjoyed it.Time I probably wouldn,t have been able to spend with them had they stayed in school.
Saying good morning to my kids in the morning, and goodnight at night wasn't enough for me. You can't get that time back, and it's hard to make it when your kids are at school.
My kids are nearly all at college, and have respectable careers. One son does video production and games design, the other is a tecnical engineer.
Being' stuck at home' was better than being 'stuck at school' for my children.
There was pressure to compete with other children over stupid things like who has the best mobile etc.
They didn't 'not fit in' because they never had the latest stuff.
Being stuck at home gave them the security of learning in a loving, safe environment, with no humiliation from teachers, and laughing from other pupils for getting things wrong.
The only thing that the children and I found hard to cope with was the stereotyping from horrible people who think its weird that a parent should want to teach her own children.
That there must be something strange going on somewhere.
Homeschoolers are among the most patient people you could meet, because they spend more time with their children than most parents, and that has its own rewards.

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Choccy
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Feb 27 2008 16:42
stella wrote:
I have been homeschooling for 10 years now, and I don't consider myself a hippie, religious freak, or any other stereotype.
I've homeschooled five well turned out kids who love wrestling, football, mixing with friends, barbie dolls, and all manner of things.

Well given this is a messageboard oriented toward class-struggle anarchism, it's not very likely (not impossible mind) that the people posting here would fit those categories. I'd be curious how many conscientious sensible homeschoolers there are on pro-homeschool messageboards rather than reactionary conspiracy cranks.

So it's kind of a moot point to to say "oh I homeschool and I'm not mental"

It is useful to hear individual experiences though - and it's sweet that your kids like wrestling, football, barbie etc wink

stella
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Feb 27 2008 17:10

For the no brainer - who wrote...
However shite mainstream schools are, I am glad that I went to one and wasn't home-schooled or go to some hippy school. It's valuable that a study is finding kids are tested too much, go to school for too long and parents are increasingly seeking alternatives but isn't everyone who gets homeschooled kids of either: a) right-wing christian fundamentalist stock, b) middle-class hippies, c) nut-job survivalists?
As for Steiner schools - aren't they just crap and pay their staff fuck-all? I mean the local Steiner schools pay teachers 10grand a year the last advert I saw.

Can I ask?
How much attention can a teacher give to every individual child,in a classroom of 30 or more; at school?
Who is checking that the teachers are giving adequate attention to your child?
How much of the teachers precious time is used to teach? as oppossed to; chasing after the kids who are smoking behind the sheds, 20 minutes in every lesson lecturing someone or the class on giving cheek .
chucking a few worksheets at you because they've got marking to do, or telling you to just copy off the person next to you because they can't be bothered explaining it again.
My daughter used to sneak her books home so she could get help from me.
After all; its only a job at the end of the day.
Could it ever mean to a teacher what it means to a mother?
Will the teacher really care if your kids pass or not?

Will you even notice if your kids start to slip at school?
How much do you check their work? really check, I mean?
What can you do about it anyway?

I noticed,
because I cared enough to check,
and cared enough to do something about it.

Every day, we hear stories of schoolchildren taking pocket knives and guns into the playground, and of bullying.

Do you know who your child played with today? at school.
There are no guns in my house.

The homeschoolers are not the ones who are neglecting their kids!
Homeschoolers are not religious nuts either!
I don't hold an assembly every morning to say prayers, and sing hymms.
My children can choose their own religion.

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Anna
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Feb 27 2008 17:13

Hahaha

stella
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Feb 27 2008 17:36

You'll find that homeschoolers can become reactionary and defensive because of the constant criticism, and attitudes that people have towards them.
As a homeschooler, and a loving mum; you do react, and take it personally when people say you're all cranks and weirdos.

You can feel singled out;like me by people because you're the only one in the street who homeschools.
I have had this a lot in my own experience.
I have family and strangers say things to the children like; you won't be able to go to college, and you won't be able to get a job,
and; how are you going to cope with no qualifications?
'Hasn't your mum put you in school yet?
and telling me things like; there was a woman in the paper who went to prison for keeping her children out of school.

It is really annoying because; they do have qualifications, and they are at college.
But people ask these things every single time they see me, and it has made me defensive.

But whenever I see a post to do with homeschooling, I do tend to comment.
Be it pro homeschooling, or ante homeschooling.

No one I know ;where I live in England, in Liverpool; homeschools, so you tend to look for outlets to talk to other homeschoolers, and will take any opportunity to educate people who misunderstand a concept they're not familiar with.

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Choccy
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Feb 27 2008 18:19

Thanks for proving my point Stella, much appreciated.
You've completely ignored 6 pages of discussion and criticisms of both homeschooling (e.g. as an individualised solution to a collective problem) and mainstream schools (e.g. class sizes too big, prescriptive& restrictive curriculums, pressure on staff) and went on a paranoid rant.

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Choccy
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Feb 27 2008 18:25
stella wrote:
Could it ever mean to a teacher what it means to a mother?
Will the teacher really care if your kids pass or not?

Would you also perform surgery on your kids? I mean, what could it possibly mean to a trained medical professional compared to what it means to a mother? As for fathers, forget them!!!

Quote:
I noticed,
because I cared enough to check,
and cared enough to do something about it.

Yep, cos working class families who send their kids to school just don't care about their kids. My parents went out to work everyday since before I was born and are still doing so - selfish pricks!!!!

As for guns in schools - yeah, there's a Columbine massacre everyday in those big mean schools roll eyes
How much cotton wool do you wrap your kids in?

It's awesome that you give a shit about your kids, really, just don't assume your idea of giving a shit can be universalised to every other family.

Caiman del Barrio
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Feb 27 2008 18:50
Choccy wrote:
I wouldn't infer my own experience onto kids.

To be fair Choccy , despite the disclaimers, that's basically what you've been doing all thread. Wow great you loved school, I find that kinda weird personally. Everyone I know hated it, with a couple of exceptions. Even the kids smart enough to do well at school basically found themselves strangled by its stupid petty rules which I basically understood to be a means of preparing children for a worklife of obedience. Teachers (well the good ones anyway) encourage you to think for myself, be analytical, draw my own conclusions, question shit etc but the moment you try to apply them principles to your schoolife outside learning you'd get punished for answering back, being insolent etc.

arf
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Feb 27 2008 19:27

To be fair to stella she does have a point, about how the constant attacks and comments and jabs people make at our decision to HE can make a person reactionary and defensive. Its like we're constantly having to justify our decision, and sometimes (often) we get treated like freaks, or like HE in itself is abusive.

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Homeschoolers are not religious nuts either!
I don't hold an assembly every morning to say prayers, and sing hymms.

Thats a fair point too. I doubt very much that there are any larger proportion of religious nuts in HE than there are in school. I would be really unhappy if my kid was singing hymns or saying prayers. And it's not just the religion i object to but all the other hierarchies and politics too.

Im not against people trying to reform schools and schooling. I think its good that people are trying to do that, its important that they do. But I think its good also that some people are trying to work out ways to raise and educate children outside of schooling. Yeh there are gonna be people who are in it for shitty reasons, but then theres people who are quite happy to ditch their kids in school and have fuck all else to do with their education - you only have to look at the sex ed arguments to see that. I think theres something really wrong with attacking people who are trying to make it work, as if we're all nuts or abusive or overprivileged. Yes it is hard to HE, from an economic pov as well as others but theres plenty of skint people doing it. Its not just rich families, again id be surprised if the proportions were really any different than those in school. I think the "its only for rich kids" thing is meant to be divisive, its designed to stop certain people from considering HE as an option. It would be better to look at ways to make it easier for people who are skint to do it if they want to, by sharing resources etc, instead of just saying basically "school is the proper place for working class kids".

I dont expect schooling or unschooling to be a priority for everyone but we do all choose our own battles. I dont think parents who send their kids to school are lazy or dont care. I get the feeling that our decision not to do that is automatically taken as an insult by schooling people. But our decision not to do school is about us, about our politics and our experiences and our family, its not meant as a judgment on everyone else.

Its a real fucker that some of the people on here are so hostile to even the basic idea of it, because theres been a few people who've come forward as HE people, and ive had pms in the past from others. I wonder what proportion of the parents on this board have done HE or have thought about it or wanted to, or how many of the adults here were HE themselves? I wonder how many of the parents here would be interested in discussions about the politics of schooling and the issues around that? I dont know if the people who are mostly against the idea are parents or no, I gather some of the "against"s are teachers themselves? I reckon we need full disclosure! grin

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Choccy
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Feb 27 2008 19:28
Caiman del Barrio wrote:
Choccy wrote:
I wouldn't infer my own experience onto kids.

To be fair Choccy , despite the disclaimers, that's basically what you've been doing all thread. Wow great you loved school, I find that kinda weird personally. Everyone I know hated it, with a couple of exceptions. Even the kids smart enough to do well at school basically found themselves strangled by its stupid petty rules which I basically understood to be a means of preparing children for a worklife of obedience. Teachers (well the good ones anyway) encourage you to think for myself, be analytical, draw my own conclusions, question shit etc but the moment you try to apply them principles to your schoolife outside learning you'd get punished for answering back, being insolent etc.

Don't be fucking mental Alan, everytime I've talked about my own experience I've been candid and said it's all I know - everyone else is putting forward subjective anecdotes so wind your neck in. What - you want to pretend I hated school when I didn't? Wise up.
I've acknowledge repeatedly the thing I found shite about school, both as teacher and student. Actually I haven't seen any homeschoolers on this thread, other perhaps Redtwister (and he isn't even homeschooling his kids) acknowledge the downsides of homeschooling, whereas pretty much everyone critical of homeschooling here has pointed out the shite aspects of mainstream schools, of which there are many.

arf
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Feb 27 2008 19:34
revol68 wrote:
I didn't like school but I enjoyed hanging around with my mates, getting into trouble, winding up teachers and the like but this is all besides the point because home schooling was not an option and will never be for the vast vast majority of people.

Well the vast majority of people dont have uni as an option either but that didnt stop you from doing it.

Pepe
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Feb 27 2008 21:13

Sorry but I can't not respond to all the stuff said about ADHD here.

It definitlely has a strong genetic component, this is backed up by loads and loads of family, adoption and twin studies. Its generally accepted that adhd is biologically based and most evidence points to that. No one these days who really knows anything about ADHD would claim that its caused by diet, get back to the 70s!
Also a lot of people with ADHD are not jumping around being disruptive, theres a subtype of the disorder where kids main problems are with organisation like losing their pencil case, are they kicking back at capitalism?

I agree with you that just handing out ritalin like sweets is a bad idea, but ADHD causes a lot of social, educational etc. problems for the people that have it an they should get treatment - this often includes modifying their environment to make life easier for them which ties into what we're saying about school being boring on this thread I guess. Theres no cure for adhd and so treatments aim to manage it . Many people will struggle because of it for the rest of our lives. Just ask Jack, it's "constantly there" wink

People who have ADHD have problems with things like impulse control, which probably has a neurological basis in most cases, up there in the prefrontal cortex although this is controversial at the moment, looks like Barkley's getting pwned.

Why are anarchists always so adamant that psychological disorders are caused by society and not biology? (of couse there is an interaction of both) The brains of people with ADHD look different to those of people without it. Although of course environment influences brain development, no environmental factors have been identified as playing a major role in ADHD. because then why would some children have it and not others (see twin studies)?

I think thats my point really, if its socially caused then why don't we all have it? Why does it occur in children raised in different ways, and only occur in some children who are raised the same?

Also, in a communist society, would we never have to pay attention to anything?

You're like those people who don't understand why people with depression can't just 'pull themselves together' or think that they're sad about capitalism or some crap.

Still, you guys aren't as bad as those pricks who think ADHD was adaptive for our ancestors.

arf
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Feb 27 2008 21:42
revol68 wrote:
arf wrote:
revol68 wrote:
I didn't like school but I enjoyed hanging around with my mates, getting into trouble, winding up teachers and the like but this is all besides the point because home schooling was not an option and will never be for the vast vast majority of people.

Well the vast majority of people dont have uni as an option either but that didnt stop you from doing it.

Yes, they are comparable afterall I'm sure homeschooling has a 43% uptake .roll eyes

Actually why stop at home schooling, why not home university, that'd be a fucking laugh.

yes they are comparable. 43% is not a "vast majority". and thats 43% of what anyway, i never worked that out - is that 43% of 18 year olds after a level, or does that include those who leave at 16?

open university is home uni, its just as valid as any other uni education. or do you think it isnt?

btw - you probably know this but it bears repeating. im not educated past 16 either. i have four gcses above grade C, and I got 4 Ds. i got a couple of NVQs at work but theyre all out of date now. i dont consider myself under educated, although officially i suppose i am. i was self teaching when i was at school and im still doing it now. im perfectly capable of teaching my kids anything they want to know, and if its something i dont know about then im capable of either teaching myself first so i can pass the skills on to them, or of looking for someone else with the ability who is willing to spend a bit of time passing it on. do you think im not, because im not officially qualified?

arf
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Feb 27 2008 21:47
Quote:
The brains of people with ADHD look different to those of people without it.

Just to ask - is it a possibility that the 'look' of a persons brain could change depending on their environment, diet, and any drugs they ingest?

yuda
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Feb 27 2008 22:04

Homeschooling doesn't have to be an individual thing, myself and my partner are looking at setting up a homeschool group with other parents in the neighbourhood. I would also disagree that homeschooling isn't a viable option for most working class families. It's just not promoted as a viable option, society in general basically wants you to have the next generation of workers then stick you kids into daycare as soon as possible so you can get back to being a productive adult. Anything outside this norm is quietly discouraged.

When I was at primary school, going on to university wasn't seen as a viable option - they were for the rich kids. None of my older brothers or sisters went onto varsity and neither we any of my firends siblings - they were more likely to be doing jail time than doing any form of tertiery study. I saw it as my lot to get through school, leave as soon as I could and get job. The only people I knew that did anything different were those lucky enough to be gifted athletes. It took me about ten years of doing dead end jobs before I went back to study to improve my lot.

I'm not saying that homeschooling is right for everyone either. My 13 y/o stepson is a case in point, he went to a school for a couple of years that has a special charter, the learning is more self directed and is looser than a state school. He couldn't really handle it, he was used to a more structured learning environment and so generally goofed around. he is also quite intelligent so could get away with mucking around a lot more than some of the other kids. He's now at a state high school and is enjoying the structure of that school much more than the previous.

stella
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Feb 28 2008 17:54

My point was not to criticize teachers or schools, but the system that runs them.
Teachers have the hardest job in the world, oversized classes, underpayed, overworked, underprotected, and I feel for them.
My children were badly bullied at school for being quiet, and with all the will in the world; there didn't seem a thing they [teachers]could do about it. They were too reluctant to expel, and too scared to tackle the offenders parents.
BY the way; parents can aquire skills in english, maths, playing an instrument, or anything else they choose.
You don't need a gym to keep fit, and you don't need a science lab to discover penicilin.
There is no subject on the planet you can't teach yourself with hard work, and the right resources.
I have taught my kids english, maths, computers, microsoft word, geography, biology, chemistry, history, art, english lit, cooking skills, sewing skills, crafts, typing, photoshop, cinema 4d, social skills,programming, design + planning, life skills,like money budgeting.
You name it, we've done it.
My son has taught himself to play the piano, with no help from me at all. My youngest two daughters are eight and twelve, and I feel they are good enough to take a gcse maths exam now.
They absolutely love getting up in the morning because they never know what new exciting skill, or fun thing we'll do that day. Every day is an adventure to them.
Learning is fun and games in our house.
I'm not a qualified teacher,but if I was studying to become a teacher, I'd do far less hours of studying than I actually do.

Typical day; do my messages, shopping, tidy house.
Start work around 12 when we've all woken up, and prepared for our day , had lunch.
Begin lessons till 5. We finish.

Straight away; after finishing; I start lessons for next day. Begin research for my lesson around 9.00 when youngest are in bed. Might finish doing my lesson at 12 on a good night. Science lessons usually take me till 3.00 in the morning. That's what time I usually end up in bed of a night; most nights.
That's 6 hours study a night, and has been for 10 years.I've been known to spend much longer on things I'm not naturally good at.
Sometimes, it can be up to 9 hours of reading a night[say if it's history.
Every single lesson is researched, written by myself, prepared, printed out, illustrated, explained, and taught the next day.
I'm tired, I'm drained, and I struggle seriously sometimes, but I keep plugging away until i have a quality lesson for the next day for them.
If I couldn't produce work to equal the work they'd get in school, I would put them back in school, because I love my kids.

stella
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Feb 28 2008 18:05

Above post was in response to the mentioned issue of homeschoolers not being qualified , which I read in one of the other posts.

A' piece of paper is not a sign of intelligence

It's a sign of hard work, and effort.

stella
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Feb 28 2008 18:16

Thanks for proving my point Stella, much appreciated.
You've completely ignored 6 pages of discussion and criticisms of both homeschooling (e.g. as an individualised solution to a collective problem) and mainstream schools (e.g. class sizes too big, prescriptive& restrictive curriculums, pressure on staff) and went on a paranoid rant.

In my own defense, I have not seen the origin of the posting till now.[6 pages of discussion
I stumbled across one page of this site accidently through a link, and a comment just caught my attention.'Thought I'd a right to respond to it.

'

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Choccy
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Feb 28 2008 19:03

Fair enough, still it'd help if you had a wee look smile

stella
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Feb 28 2008 19:12

Last point on the matter

Successful &Famous People that were Homeschooled

Homeschooling has become an increasingly popular alternative to a traditional education. Children who have homeschooling often flourish academically and go on to achieve success later in life. Here are some examples of highly successful people who were homeschooled.

Did they go on to do bigger and better things? You be the judge.

Venus and Serena Williams were both homeschooled and learned tennis at the early age of four.
Their father, Richard Williams, is the son of a Louisiana sharecropper. He learned to play tennis by reading books and watching videos.

Artists

Claude Monet
Leonardo da Vinci
Jamie Wyeth
Andrew Wyeth
John Singleton Copley

Inventors

Alexander Graham Bell
Thomas Edison
Alec Issigonis
Cyrus McCormick
The Wright Brothers

Scientists

Blaise Pascal
Pierre Curie
Albert Einstein
Booker T. Washington
George Washington Carver

Presidents

George Washington
Thomas Jefferson
John Quincy Adams
James Madison
William Henry Harrison
John Tyler
Abraham Lincoln
Theordore Roosevelt
Woodrow Wilson
Franklin Delano Roosevelt Winston Churchill

Statesmen

Winston Churchill
Konrad Adenauer
Benjamin Franklin
Patrick Henry
William Penn
Henry Clay

Composers and Musicians

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
Anton Bruckner
Felix Mendelssohn
Francis Poulenc
Conlon Nancarrow
Irving Berlin
Yehudi Menuhin

Writers

Agatha Christie
C.S. Lewis
George Bernard Shaw
Noel Coward
D.H. Lawrence
Hans Christian Anderson
Charles Dickens
Mark Twain
Margaret Mead
Sean O'Casey
Rumer Godden
Brett Harte
Phillis Wheatley
Mercy Warren
Pearl S. Buck

Miscellaneous

Charles Chaplin - Actor
Florence Nightingale - Nurse
John Burroughs - Naturalist
Charles Louis Montesquieu - Philosopher
Albert Schweitzer - Physician
George Rogers Clark - Explorer
Andrew Carnegie - Industrialist
Bill Ridell - Newspaperman
Will Rogers - Humorist
Tamara McKinney - World Cup Skier
Jim Ryan - World Runner
Ansel Adams - Photographer
John Stuart Mill - Economist
John Paul Jones - father of the American Navy
Clara Barton - started the Red Cross
Abigail Adams - wife of John Adams
Martha Washington - wife of George W.
Educators

Frank Vandiver (President - Texas
A&M)
Fred Terman (President - Stanford)
William Samuel Johnson (President
Columbia)
John Witherspoon (President of
Princeton)

American Presidents

George Washington
Thomas Jefferson
John Quincy Adams
James Madison
William Henry Harrison
John Tyler
Abraham Lincoln
Theordore Roosevelt
Woodrow Wilson
Franklin Delano Roosevelt
US Constitutional Convention Delegates

George Washington - 1st President of the U.S.
James Madison - 4th President of the U.S.
John Witherspoon - President of Princeton U.
Benjamin Franklin - inventor and statesman
William S. Johnson - President of Columbia C.
George Clymer - U.S. Representative
Charles Pickney III - Governor of S. Carolina
John Francis Mercer - U.S. Representative
George Wythe - Justice of Virginia High Court
William Blount - U.S. Senator
Richard D. Spaight - Governor of N. Carolina
John Rutledge - Chief Justice U.S. Supr Court
William Livingston - Governor of New Jersey
Richard Basset - Governor of Delaware
William Houston - lawyer
William Few - U.S. Senator
George Mason

United States Supreme Court Judges

John Jay
John Marshall
John Rutledge

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Khawaga
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Feb 28 2008 19:39

I'd be interested in the background of all of those famous folks. Did they have rich parents, were they well educated etc. A cursory look at the list tells me that most of them were from pretty well off backgrounds. For many poor, working class families home schooling is simply not an option even if they really wanted to do that for their kids (though obviously home schooling doesn't have to be done by the child's direct family). This is not to detract from the benefits home schooling can give you, but you have to put it in the context that this is a libertarian communist site and for that reason I really think you should read through the whole discussion.

stella
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Feb 28 2008 20:01

Please look harder at that list. There are people there who are not well off.
I'm not well off.Live in one of the worst places of Liverpool.Couldn't get my kids into a decent school.The schools by me are not very successful, and I couldn't get them into the school where I did wanted to send them because they were full.
Home school was not an option for me. I had to look after my husband who is severely epileptic,and monophobic, and can't work], and have five kids to look after. We had no money, and no computer.
Everyting was handwritten by me at first and it was hard, but there were libraries, and tv, and second hand stores for old books.
I've had to save hard for the resources I have now. The only real resources I have now is the internet, and a printer but worth its weight in gold.It can be done.
Homeschooling was just meant to be until I found them a new school, but it worked, so we carried on.
We are struggling on benefits now, with 5 mouths to feed, but we are determined to give our kids just as good an education as other better off folk do.

yuda
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Feb 28 2008 20:06
Khawaga wrote:
For many poor, working class families home schooling is simply not an option even if they really wanted to do that for their kids (though obviously home schooling doesn't have to be done by the child's direct family).

Why is it not an option? I have read that by at least three different people on this thread, but no one has explained why they don't think it is an option

stella
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Feb 28 2008 20:10

I felt Homeschooling wasn't an option for me at the time, because I felt I couldn't afford to do it at first, and I wouldn't be able to cope.
But then I realised that you don't need to be rich to homeschool. Been 10 years now.

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Anna
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Feb 28 2008 20:17
yuda wrote:
Khawaga wrote:
For many poor, working class families home schooling is simply not an option even if they really wanted to do that for their kids (though obviously home schooling doesn't have to be done by the child's direct family).

Why is it not an option? I have read that by at least three different people on this thread, but no one has explained why they don't think it is an option

stella has said that she teaches her children for 5 hours a day, and prepares the lessons for a further 6 hours. Homeschooling is 'not an option' for a parent who works for the simple reason that there aren't an extra 11 hours in the day.

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madashell
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Feb 28 2008 20:18
yuda wrote:
Why is it not an option? I have read that by at least three different people on this thread, but no one has explained why they don't think it is an option

It's an option if at least one parent is unemployed, but if both parents work, it's just not doable. All my life, both of my parents have been employed, there was no way in hell either of my parents could afford to quit their job when I was a kid.

stella
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Feb 28 2008 20:59

Khawaga wrote:
For many poor, working class families home schooling is simply not an option even if they really wanted to do that for their kids (though obviously home schooling doesn't have to be done by the child's direct family).

In response to that; there is no reason why poor people cannot educate.If you can read; you can educate.
For single working mothers; it probably couldn't be an option.
But there are many mothers at home with working husbands; who could do it, if they did really want to.

I think that people are scared to homeschool because there is a stigma attached to homeschoolers; weirdos, hippies, and what was it? religious nuts / and people don't want to be associated with it.

Home is just another place where our kids can do schoolwork.
There are good and bad homeschoolers like there are good and bad teachers.

If kids do well at school, then its good, and they should be left there.
And if kids are doing well at home; the same.
It's just another way.

But people who are seeking an alternative to school for whatever reason.;bullying etc
should not be made to feel stigmatized by society.

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jef costello
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Feb 28 2008 21:38

your list is pretty short considering it goes back at least to the 18th century.
11 hours a day is a hell of a lot and I'm not sure most people could have managed that, I don't think my parents could have done it without us being evicted.

Stella when you are quoting people could you highlight the text that you are quoting and then click on the 'quote' button above the text box. That way it will show up as a quotation and it will be easier to follow your answers. I know some of the posters on here have been quite vitriolic but try not to respond aggressively what you are saying is quite interesting. I'm very interested in the practicalities of this, I'm not sure how well it would work in practise so it is interesting to hear from people who are actually doing it. Lists of supreme court justices whjo didn't go to school isn't something that impresses any of us.

stella
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Joined: 27-02-08
Feb 28 2008 22:16

Supreme court justices just happened to be on the end of a long list from a website.
The list isn't very long, but it would take many pages to list every single homeschooled success from the 18th century till present.
I agree that Lists of supreme court justices whjo didn't go to school isn't something that impresses any of us.
But nor do some of the decisions of current politicians who did go to school, and university, and whose hands our future lies in.

arf
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Joined: 25-11-06
Feb 28 2008 22:16

i think the bedingfields were homeschooled, but i didnt let it put me off grin