Anarchist resistance after the Spanish Civil War

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yuda
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Apr 22 2008 07:06
Anarchist resistance after the Spanish Civil War

I posted an enquiry last night which got sucked into the great void. I have been reading the Stuart Christie book: Granny Made Me an Anarchist: General Franco, The Angry Brigade and Me. I was looking for any other books, etc on the Anarchist Resistance to Franco after '39.

Someone pointed to the the book Sabate: Guerilla Extraordinary and also christie films. Are there any other sources anyone can think of?

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Anarchia
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Apr 22 2008 08:46

The one we talked about earlier, The International Revolutionary Solidarity Movement: 1st Of May Group edited by Albert Meltzer. BTW, gimme a text if you want it brought down for you and I can sort it (I'm getting something too)...

yuda
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Apr 22 2008 08:57

Yip get it sent down. (can't be arsed going downstars to get my phone) cheers

BB
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Sep 11 2008 10:06
yuda wrote:
Someone pointed to the the book Sabate: Guerilla Extraordinary and also christie films. Are there any other sources anyone can think of?

Twas I, also try the Kate sharpley library, they've got a few pamphlets on it. http://www.katesharpleylibrary.net/bulletin/publications.htm.

The new Juan garcia oliver pamphlet (about his life) by the KSL has got a couple of pages about it after the main interview, i think JGO was (or was asked to be) secretary of the MIL*

*Oops, It was the DI (defensa interior). A bit of a difference there. 11/09/08.

Black Badger
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Apr 22 2008 14:43

this is from the latest issue of Anarchy magazine
http://anarchymag.org

by Barry Pateman

As you get older you find yourself doing more and more of these events and it’s quite sad as well as quite heartening in many ways. I remember speaking 20 years ago in Conway Hall, in London, about 50 years after the Spanish Revolution, and it is somewhat haunting to think that that generation of militants are now dead and gone.

So tonight I want to talk about the anarchist resistance to Franco, from 1939 onwards. Before I do that I want to say two or three things, because some of the things I say may sound rather harsh and critical of the CNT (and I’m not really going to talk about anything else apart from anarchism). So if it sounds harsh, it’s simply to try and be realistic. I am not particularly cruel or thoughtless or heartless or smug. It’s very easy for all of us, 70 years onward, to say clever statements about it or think smugly about it or try and use it as a debating point. The truth of the matter is that probably if you look at the 20th century, the anarchists, both in the CNT-FAI and the FIJL (the libertarian youth), and the anarchists who were not involved in those organizations, came nearer to creating a revolutionary change in everyday life than anyone else ever did.

Those years in Aragon, Barcelona, and the Levant were probably the high watermark of possibility. The anarchists involved called it “a living utopia.” They touched something that you and I can only dream about and talk about. They actually did it for awhile. No matter how awkward, how ungainly, they achieved something in their life that you and I are trying to do every day and not achieving. And because they did that, because they changed everything that made up their lives, because they took individual-collective responsibility, and they changed patterns that had been locked into their brains for centuries, and they were aware of the potential in each person that could flourish and grow, we must keep looking at it and we must keep thinking about it. Spain isn’t going to go away, and we’ll always return to it as anarchists, thinking about what we can learn and what we can do to make what they did real. And I for one, would very much like it to be real, rather than some intellectual ideal, or something to talk about over three pints of bitter.

When the Civil War/Revolution ended, there were two main areas where the anarchists moved to: France and from France to Mexico. And it’s those militants who stayed in France that I want to talk about today. They settled there and were repatriated into concentration camps, both in France and in North Africa. Conditions were horrendous. Many of them broke out, but within the camps themselves they also began to reorganize the CNT, to try and bring it back to life, to keep it going not only for those in the camps but for the militants who hadn’t left Spain; they tried to revive it in Spain. You must remember the CNT had always been persecuted; the CNT had had periods of being underground, so it wasn’t a totally new experience— though this was a far more brutal underground than they’d ever had before. And what they did was to carry the problems that the CNT had not been able to deal with into those camps and into exile.

By the way, we would be foolish to underestimate the psychological effects of exile. There is an enormously potent story by Ethel Mannin, the British novelist, called Refugees. Ethel Mannin had spoken on the same platform as Emma Goldman in London and had supported the CNT-FAI, and one of the sentences that you read in that story, it’s haunting. Rodriguez, one of the militants, says, “Our days which had been so full, so full and busy, were now just empty,” as they sat in the cold English suburb with nothing to do and nowhere to go but just to sit and talk and talk. And that effect in itself was brutal.

for more see the magazine

David in Atlanta
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Apr 22 2008 20:42

Looks like the site burped or something, I lost a couple of posts. angry
Anyway, try this Spanish Resistance

Eastern Barbarian
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Apr 22 2008 20:49

KSL got lots of stuff about it. I wrote little book about a subject but its in Polish only...

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Global Dissident
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Apr 23 2008 01:27

I saw that on AK Press, I would have ordered it, but the shipping from Oakland would have been too much. I wonder if my local library has it?

yuda
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Apr 23 2008 06:59
Global Dissident wrote:
I saw that on AK Press, I would have ordered it, but the shipping from Oakland would have been too much. I wonder if my local library has it?

The Christie book? if so, I would highly recommend it . I believe they may have co-published it with AK Press UK and may have copies of it. A quick scan of their site suggests not, but no harm in flicking them an email. They do however have the third book in that series Edward Heath Made Me Angry

http://www.akuk.com/

Black Badger
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Apr 23 2008 14:38

Why not go directly to Christie? His website is www.christiebooks.com

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Steven.
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May 12 2008 19:37

we got AFAIK the biggest online archive about it: http://libcom.org/tags/spanish-resistance

zarathustra
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May 12 2008 19:40
Asher wrote:
The one we talked about earlier, The International Revolutionary Solidarity Movement: 1st Of May Group edited by Albert Meltzer. BTW, gimme a text if you want it brought down for you and I can sort it (I'm getting something too)...

Yup, essential reading. Kate Sharpley Library published some other stuff, including a pamphlet by Octavio Alberola. I haven't read it, but he was one of the leaders of post-Sabate Spanish resistance.

They also published a book about the "plan to bomb Franco from the air". The leader of that plan was a founder of the CNT railroad union and was murdered by fascist-state death squads in the 70s I think.

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Anarchia
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May 15 2008 02:36

Yep, I got the IRSM one, read it, and passed it on to yuda yesterday smile

I'm looking forward to having a good look through the KSL when I'm in the UK in a few weeks...

BB
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Jun 26 2008 11:24

New, Kate Sharpley release.

Salvador Puig Antich and the MIL (Movimiento Iberico de Liberacion) (edited by Anna Key, translated by Paul Sharkey - 36 pages)