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What Are You Reading?

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freemind
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May 25 2010 20:15

I'm currently reading Chomsky's Perilous Power which as ever has some unknown detail and is based on conversations with Lebanese critic Gilbert Achcar.

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Farce
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May 25 2010 21:07

Just started reading Revolution of Everyday Life for the first time. Also picked up 10 Hours That Shook Trafalgar Square, Come and Wet This Truncheon, Tyranny of Structurelessness/Tyranny and a few other things at the Sheffield bookfair. Before that, read a big collection of Joan Didion's essays, fucking amazing, one of the best grimmest writers ever. It should be pretty much compulsory for anyone who's a communist to read "Comrade Laski, C.P.U.S.A. (M.-L.)" and a few other pieces, like "On the Morning After the Sixties."

AuthoritarianAn...
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May 25 2010 21:30

Cheers comrades, i'll get reading them straight away.

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JoeMaguire
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May 25 2010 22:00
renegado wrote:
revol68 wrote:
Althusser is the shittest writer i've ever read, there's more lyrical prose in a TV manual.

You'll find no argument from me here.

Aside from being dry, is the book reading otherwise?

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JoeMaguire
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May 25 2010 23:37
Twat wrote:
I'm reading a bill hicks book lol and one on political ideology.

Could anyone suggest to me further reading in these area's:
Organising,funding and implementing a revolutionary strategy
Anarcho-communist theory (aswell as practical examples)
History of anarchism
The "philosophy" of anarchism

Thanks
Viva La Revolucion

Libcom has an extensive library. I would recommend picking out articles on a regular basis to pad out what you know, for the very simple reason that strategy and propaganda are indispensable part of having an analysis. Pick out books from the reading list. And try reading with others or at least critiquing/discussing what you have read, there is nothing worse than having a static understanding of classics, because that ergo means you have an orthodox or lazy interpretation.
Personally I would suggest you read Marx, Kropotkin, Goldman, Bakunin, Rocker to get you started.

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circle A-K
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May 26 2010 03:18

The Critical Criminology Companion
Editors: Thalia Anthony and Chris Cunneen

Just started... but looks like it will be very useful for research. The authors are mainly from oz/nz, but the discussion is not oz/nz specific. A good critique of mainstream criminology so far, look forward to reading a lot more.

By the way, found a great place to buy books anywhere in the world! I usually get from a local online bookstore but this place has free worldwide delivery, and heaps of the books are like half price to begin with (comparing my wishlist from another site to this site, it was seriously about half price on a lot of the books, plus no shipping *squeels*).

Anyway, links - bookdepository.co.uk

bootsy
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May 26 2010 04:17
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I'm roughly halfway through "The Second Sex" by Simone de Beauvoir. Generally I prefer lighter reading!

I got halfway through 'The Mandarins' and gave up because it was too boring. Her autobiography is choice though.

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Farce
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May 26 2010 07:17
bootsy wrote:
Quote:
I'm roughly halfway through "The Second Sex" by Simone de Beauvoir. Generally I prefer lighter reading!

I got halfway through 'The Mandarins' and gave up because it was too boring. Her autobiography is choice though.

Yeah, I've only read 3/4 of it (seriously, who writes four books just about their own life?) but it is amazingly well-written. Not tried the Mandarins but I thought She Came To Stay and All Men Are Mortal were both mint as well.

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ludd
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May 26 2010 07:18

Nearly done with E.P. Thompson's Making of the English Working Class. It's been very valuable to me in making sense of early history of anti-capitalism

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Entdinglichung
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May 26 2010 12:16

Patrick Brantlinger: Dark vanishings : discourse on the extinction of primitive races, 1800-1930

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x359594
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May 26 2010 20:48

Currently reading The Complete Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway and just finished "Che Ti Diche la Patria?" an understated and trenchant account of a rode trip through fascist Italy by two American travelers.

I'm re-visiting Hemingway's work for the first time in over 40 years after reading The Breaking Point by Stephen Koch which tells of Hemingway's falling out with John Dos Passos over the murder of Dos Passos' friend Jose Robles by NKVD agents in Spain during the Civil War. Koch is a neo-con and tells a breathlessly gossipy story about Hemingway and Dos Passos in Spain. Dos Passos' experiences in Spain led to his embrace of the Right and his scatter shot anti-communism of later years.

bootsy
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May 26 2010 22:57
Farce wrote:
bootsy wrote:
Quote:
I'm roughly halfway through "The Second Sex" by Simone de Beauvoir. Generally I prefer lighter reading!

I got halfway through 'The Mandarins' and gave up because it was too boring. Her autobiography is choice though.

Yeah, I've only read 3/4 of it (seriously, who writes four books just about their own life?) but it is amazingly well-written. Not tried the Mandarins but I thought She Came To Stay and All Men Are Mortal were both mint as well.

Wait has she written four autobiographies?? :S Coz I've only read 'Memoirs of a Dutiful Daughter'.

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Farce
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May 26 2010 23:31
bootsy wrote:
Farce wrote:
bootsy wrote:
Quote:
I'm roughly halfway through "The Second Sex" by Simone de Beauvoir. Generally I prefer lighter reading!

I got halfway through 'The Mandarins' and gave up because it was too boring. Her autobiography is choice though.

Yeah, I've only read 3/4 of it (seriously, who writes four books just about their own life?) but it is amazingly well-written. Not tried the Mandarins but I thought She Came To Stay and All Men Are Mortal were both mint as well.

Wait has she written four autobiographies?? :S Coz I've only read 'Memoirs of a Dutiful Daughter'.

Memoirs of a Dutiful Daughter about when she was proper young, The Prime of Life about her 20s/30s when the Nazi occupation of France and stuff happened, Force of Circumstance (which is the one I haven't read) about her middle age when she wrote The Second Sex and stuff, and All Said And Done about old age. It'd take quite a while to read all four, but based on the ones I have read I'd definitely recommend them, especially if you liked Memoirs of a DD.

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Elly
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May 27 2010 00:01

twilight

Boris Badenov
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May 27 2010 02:28
circle A-K wrote:

By the way, found a great place to buy books anywhere in the world! I usually get from a local online bookstore but this place has free worldwide delivery, and heaps of the books are like half price to begin with (comparing my wishlist from another site to this site, it was seriously about half price on a lot of the books, plus no shipping *squeels*).

Anyway, links - bookdepository.co.uk

that looks interesting; thanks for the link.

Spassmaschine
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May 27 2010 06:04

bookfinder.com is also quite good, even for obscure stuff. It searches about 150,000 different sellers and compares costs including shipping to whatever country in whatever currency.

gypsy
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May 27 2010 07:59

Currently reading Durutti in the Spanish Revolution by the late Abel Paz.

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Joseph Kay
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May 27 2010 15:38
allybaba wrote:
Currently reading Durutti in the Spanish Revolution by the late Abel Paz.

Great book.

I'm currently reading various international relations theory alongside re-reading Capital Vol I with my flatmate and .

petey
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May 27 2010 15:42
Farce wrote:
It should be pretty much compulsory for anyone who's a communist to read "Comrade Laski, C.P.U.S.A. (M.-L.)"

i've read a review of this, sounds horrid (that is, horridly real), it's on my short list

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Entdinglichung
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May 27 2010 16:12
petey wrote:
Farce wrote:
It should be pretty much compulsory for anyone who's a communist to read "Comrade Laski, C.P.U.S.A. (M.-L.)"

i've read a review of this, sounds horrid (that is, horridly real), it's on my short list

The main subjective factor entering into this development, the main thing which ensures the correct development of the struggles of youth and students, and the rebuilding of the genuine Communist leadership of youth, is the rebuilding of the Communist Party itself. The party of the proletariat in the U.S.A. was reconstituted in Los Angeles, California, September 4-5, 1965 at the Founding Conference of the Communist Party of the United States of America (Marxist-Leninist). The CP.U.S.A. (M-L) is the party of the proletariat and the vanguard of the working class of the U.S.A.. The CP.U.S.A. (M.-L.) stands in opposition to the U.S. revisionists (the so-called “Communist” Party), the trotskyites (SWP, YSA. Spartacists, Workers World, Workers League, etc.), the conciliators of revisionism (Progressive Labor, Ad Hoc Committee, etc.) and all other expressions of imperialism and imperialist ideology in the ranks of the working-class. The C.P.U.S.A.(M.-L.) does not engage in any joint action with the above tendencies or any other expression of imperialism or revisionism. The firm and principled politics and General Program of the C.P.U.S.A.(M.-L.) and its activity lay the basis for the carrying forward of the class struggle of the proletariat in the U.S. to its historic tasks. The leadership of the CP.U.S.A. (M.-L.) insures the rebuilding of the Communist leadership of youth in the U.S.A. along correct lines.

sounds similar to the hostility clause of a certain party in Britain

Boris Badenov
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May 27 2010 16:24

Like many on this thread, I am attempting a cover-to-cover reading of Capital (all of it this time). On the side, I have Harvey's companion to Capital, "Christianizing the Roman Empire, 100-400" by Ramsey MacMullen, and "The Bolsheviks in power: the first year of Soviet rule in Petrograd" by Alexander Rabinowitch (which I have kind of been neglecting although it's very enlightening).

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mikail firtinaci
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May 27 2010 16:39
Quote:
Currently reading Durutti in the Spanish Revolution by the late Abel Paz.

the book is going to end unsurprisingly but unfortunately with the death of Durruti in 1937. One of the most crucial period of the civil war - the barcelona May 3 insurrection- is going to be left out...

I know that the book is about durruti but considering the narrative is flowing like the life of durruti and the spanish anarchosyndicalism at least the civil war is interwined it gives the impression that Paz is living out a last crucial chapter of settlement and balance sheet...

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fingers malone
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May 27 2010 17:08

Just started "Villains of all Nations" by Rediker, about early eighteenth century pirates. And rereading Q, but in Spanish.

Wellclose Square
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May 27 2010 20:01

Still reading Hans Fallada's Alone in Berlin. Mulling over whether to pick up where I left off with Saree Makdisi's William Blake and the Impossible History of the 1790s or start all over again - concealed within its dense prose is a commentary on Blake's still relevant critique of 'organ-ization' as an element of the consolidation of bourgeois hegemony (will 'report back' on that in a few months).

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gram negative
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May 27 2010 23:06

right now i am reading kenneth lapides' 'marx's wage theory in historical perspective' which i wholeheartedly endorse so far, at least for his work in collecting all of marx's diverse comments on wages in one place. does anybody know anything about lapides? i know that he wrote a book on marx and engels on trade unions, but I can't seem to find any other information on him. also, capital, like many others in this thread, and i have started a survey on advanced mathematics (it's the title, seriously).

october_lost wrote:
I have just finished reading Arif Dirlik - Anarchism in the Chinese Revolution

how is that? i've had my eye on it for a while...

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Nate
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May 28 2010 06:35

I've been meaning to finish a thorough read of chapter 25 of Capital since last August. Umm. It's going not quite awesomely.

I just read Franco Berardi's book The Soul at Work. It's terrible and post-operaismo should be abolished.

I just skimmed Encountering Revolution by Ashli White, it's about US responses to refugees from the Haitian revolution in the late 1790s and early 1800s. It's good but there's not enough background on the events of the Haitian rev.

Soon I'm gonna make myself read some Tiqqun and The Coming Insurrection. I can't remember why.

Wellclose Square
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May 28 2010 10:15

Further to my above post, here's Makdisi's Blake book on google books - worth a look:

http://books.google.com/books?id=pgkE8VfxzGoC&printsec=frontcover&dq=%27%27Saree+Makdisi%27%27&cd=1#v=onepage&q&f=false

accent
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May 28 2010 10:31

the new translation of 'bloom theory.'
bloom.jottit.com

petey
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May 28 2010 15:03
Vlad336 wrote:
"Christianizing the Roman Empire, 100-400" by Ramsey MacMullen

a good book, don't be put off by the oily tone. he wrote many books, whose best feature is that they're short.

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Schwarz
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May 28 2010 17:18
Quote:
It's good but there's not enough background on the events of the Haitian rev.

If you've never read the Black Jacobins by C.L.R. James I would check it out. Great background on the Haitian Revolution, reads well, and there is some interesting class analysis to boot.