New Paul Mason book

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mariajones
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May 15 2012 15:23

I didn't read all the comments - when is it going to be published? I did check out the video, good stuff.

no1
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May 15 2012 15:50
mariajones wrote:
when is it going to be published?

It came out a few weeks ago.

wojtek
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Jul 1 2012 21:21

The graduates of 2012 will survive only in the cracks of our economy

wojtek
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Jul 2 2012 18:50

Six quick notes on Paul Mason’s piece on the ‘Graduate Without A Future’

wojtek
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Jul 4 2012 17:54

There was a Novara discussion today on Paul Mason's piece and The Guardian are doing a series on 'the graduate without a future', which includes the following article by Nina Power:

Absurd student debt has ended mass inclusion – our future is at risk

Mark.
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Oct 17 2012 11:22

I wasn't that sure what to make of the chapter on networks in the book. Paul Mason has just done an interview with Manuel Castells which I suppose is relevant to this and doesn't really justify a new thread. Any thoughts on it?

Paul Mason wrote:

When most of us were still struggling to work our analogue modems, in the mid-1990s, one man had worked out where the internet was going.

Manuel Castells, one of the world's most cited sociologists, proclaimed the dawn of the "network society".

In pioneering quantitative research, he discovered that internet use and "projects of personal autonomy" fed off each other: that the internet, in other words, was changing our social attitudes and even our very selves.

For Radio 4's Analysis, on Monday night at 8.30pm, I quiz Professor Castells about his new book Aftermath - which looks at how the current financial crisis has produced networked protest movements, and even new "non-capitalist" forms of economic behaviour (the programme was recorded with a live audience at the London School of Economics last week)…

Listen to the interview here

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Indigo
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Oct 17 2012 11:27

I caught that talk a couple of days ago, makes for an interesting listen. I think it raised some interesting points about how identity can be influenced by an increasingly networked way of life. I may go ahead and get Castells book once I've got a bit of book money floating around. I'd be interested to hear from anyone that has read it already.

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jura
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Oct 17 2012 16:01

Indigo, save your money and get a shitload of books by Castells for free here: http://libgen.info/search.php?search_type=magic&search_text=manuel+caste...Поиск (just click on a title and then click "Get!").

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Oct 17 2012 17:54

Thanks jura, thats my day off sorted! surprised

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jura
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Oct 17 2012 18:11

Sorry about that wink

wojtek
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Feb 26 2013 21:00

Novara: Series 2, Episode 23 - 'Why It's Still Kicking Off Everywhere'

Quote:
On this week's show James Butler and Aaron Peters are joined by Paul Mason, economics editor for BBC Newsnight, as they discuss some of the issues in the second edition of his book 'Why It's (Still) Kicking Off Everywhere'

Mark.
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Jun 20 2013 10:02

Paul Mason on the protests in Turkey, Brazil and Bulgaria:

Shared symbolism of global youth unrest

Mark.
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Aug 30 2013 21:20

Paul Mason calling himself an anarcho-syndicalist?

Nick Cohen wrote:

The success of Channel 4 News in replacing Newsnight as the preeminent current affairs programme on British television is one of those events that fascinates journalists but leaves the public cold...

...as things stand, Newsnight's best journalists are walking out of its understaffed newsroom. The programme is glum and timid, racked by scandal and self-doubt...

Paul Mason, Newsnight's economics editor, is a furrow-browed theorist from the Marxisant Left...

In a statement, Mason said he was leaving because he wanted the freedom to write books without submitting them to the BBC's censors...

wojtek
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Sep 3 2013 22:15

BBC Radio 4 Great Lives: Paul Mason on Louise Michel

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TV journalist and writer Paul Mason talks to Matthew Parris about the 19th Century French anarchist, Louise Michel, heroine of the Paris Commune. They're joined by historian Carolyn Eichner who says that Michel "expounded action and aggression with a theatrical, infectious elegance."

Caiman del Barrio
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Sep 4 2013 09:01

He can only join SF if he's willing to organise Channel 4.

(Or write for Direct Action.)

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plasmatelly
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Sep 4 2013 11:42
wojtek wrote:
BBC Radio 4 Great Lives: Paul Mason on Louise Michel

Quote:
TV journalist and writer Paul Mason talks to Matthew Parris about the 19th Century French anarchist, Louise Michel, heroine of the Paris Commune. They're joined by historian Carolyn Eichner who says that Michel "expounded action and aggression with a theatrical, infectious elegance."

Good program that. A bit surprised by his choice.

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Sep 4 2013 15:52

I'd have thought he was much closer to a modern day De Leonist than any sort of anarchist as he is pretty supportive of the party form and electoralism as part of an overall strategy - or at least that's how I have read him.

Burgers
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Feb 22 2016 16:03

Some people maybe interested in this response from the Communist Workers' Organisation to Paul Mason's new book.

Post-capitalism via the Internet (According to Paul Mason) – Dream or Reality?

Quote:
Introduction

The book “Postcapitalism – A Guide to our Future” by Paul Mason (PM) is creating a lot of interest amongst the political left in general and in particular amongst the anarchist and left-communist milieu. The book tries to identify the forces which have shaped capitalist society in the past and which at present are determining its future. It argues that Internet Technology (IT) is a route to a society beyond capitalism. This central claim is a provocative challenge to Marxism which he condemns as having failed the test of history. The book contains a lot of interesting historical details and facts about the contemporary world together with discussions of ideas of economic and political thinkers. It is written in an accessible journalistic style and so is it easy to read.

Paul Mason’s central thesis can be outlined as follows. Industrial capitalism has evolved, since its inception in the late 18th century, in a series of long term cycles, called Kondratieff cycles 1 or waves, each lasting approximately 50 years. There have been 4 such cycles and we are now entering the 5th cycle. However because neo-liberalism has been so successful in shattering the resistance of the working class, the 4th cycle has been extended beyond the 50 year period. In addition because neo-liberalism has broken the resistance of the working class, the capitalist class cannot develop a new paradigm of exploitation as occurred at the start of the previous cycles. The 5th cycle cannot, therefore, take off and we are in a period of stagnation. Capitalism has reached the limit of its capacity to adapt. In addition capitalism has invented a technology, in the internet and Information Technology (IT), which it cannot control and which is undermining capitalist relations. IT is, PM claims, undermining the working of the capitalist market, leading to social production and so opening the way to a post-capitalist society. We are therefore at the start of a transition period to post-capitalism; a transition in which post-capitalism coexists with capitalism as a parallel system of production; a transition which could take centuries. However, because of a number of existential threats, such as climate change, demographic change in global population and sovereign debt, humanity does not have the time to let this transition run its course. Therefore, although post-capitalism is happening anyway, we need to mobilise the state to speed up the transition.