Germany: "Far-right unionists gain popularity despite rising wages"

38 posts / 0 new
Last post
syndicalist
Offline
Joined: 15-04-06
May 31 2018 15:43

Ok. I'm appreciative of all contributions which lay out respective views
I'm cool with disagreements, let's just try and keep them
political and principled, comrades

Salvoechea
Offline
Joined: 17-05-04
Jun 1 2018 00:16

answering to RM, I'd said that all the strategic sectors of economy (energy, transport, communications, mining, oil, etc.) must be public far from present day dictatorship of markets. I don't think this is essentially revolutionary, but common sense. Thatcher did a good job in anarchists supporting neoliberalism! We defend expropriations and self-management, but it is to be noted that it's far more easy to organize in the public sector than in private companies.

Anarcho-syndicalism defend the seizure of the means of production, right? So, our organizations need to organize workers in base of something apart from mere defense of our jobs. In CNT we struggle to revert 90's privatizations:

[Madrid] Concentración por la Remunicipalización de los Servicios Públicos
http://cnt.es/noticias/madrid-concentraci%C3%B3n-por-la-remunicipalizaci...

[Gráficas-Madrid] Por una gestión directa de Madrid Destino del servicio de acomodación en los teatros de Madrid
http://www.cnt.es/noticias/gr%C3%A1ficas-madrid-por-una-gesti%C3%B3n-dir...

But also CGT is doing some work in this direction:

La subrogación en los procesos de remunicipalización
http://www.cgtmurcia.org/sindical/sectores/adm-publica/2311-la-subrogaci...

http://www.cgtaytozar.com/historico/enero-2016.html

Nacionalización, privatización, socialización, autogestión Cuestionar el derecho a la propiedad
http://www.rojoynegro.info/articulo/ideas/nacionalizaci%C3%B3n-privatiza...

Or we're even asking for nationalizations:
http://cnt.es/noticias/valladolid-cr%C3%B3nicas-del-1%C2%BA-de-mayo

http://cnt.es/noticias/declaraci%C3%B3n-del-sindicalismo-de-clase-y-alte...

It is important to create a different alternative to neoliberal model even if it's not exactly what we want. In Spain cooperativism is growing quite a lot, which is good, but it is highly dependent of state money in subsidies, which is dangerous. In fact in Barcelona it is being used as a tricky way to privatize parts of the public sector.

In short, CNT (and CGT and Soli) want that trade unions to be a part in the control and the management of all the public sector. We aspire to manage it one day, but at first we don't want it to be destroyed or cut into parts. We organize better when we're seen by other workers in these struggles to defend the company. This gives a us sense of responsibility.

Coming back to what sovereignty is, in other words it is to stop globalization, as this model benefits the rich countries and prejudices the poor ones. For instance:

https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2017/dec/29/vintage-cloth...

why is this bad? Is it wrong to have a national industry? The point is to have later strong unions to be able to control these new industries. How are workers to be organized in a stagnant survival economy?

akai
Offline
Joined: 29-09-06
Jun 1 2018 09:04

Glad to see there are still a few principled internationalists who have held out here. But the OP was on another subject. Maybe the discussion could be taken to this thread:

http://libcom.org/forums/theory/myths-national-autonomy-01062018

Salvoechea
Offline
Joined: 17-05-04
Jun 1 2018 09:38

admin - split to https://libcom.org/forums/theory/myths-national-autonomy-01062018

Mike Harman
Offline
Joined: 7-02-06
Jun 1 2018 11:54
Salvoechea wrote:
answering to RM, I'd said that all the strategic sectors of economy (energy, transport, communications, mining, oil, etc.) must be public far from present day dictatorship of markets. I don't think this is essentially revolutionary, but common sense. Thatcher did a good job in anarchists supporting neoliberalism! We defend expropriations and self-management, but it is to be noted that it's far more easy to organize in the public sector than in private companies.

At the height of nationalisation in the UK in the '40s-'60s, there were British anarchists writing critiques of it:

https://libcom.org/history/neither-nationalisation-nor-privatisation-194...
https://libcom.org/history/nationalisation-new-boss-tom-brown

There are now ex-anarchist and ex-Trotskyist Labour Party activists calling for nationalisation of the arms industry in the UK as well as increasing national funding for it: https://libcom.org/blog/poverty-luxury-communism-05042018 / https://libcom.org/blog/paul-masons-workers-bombers-13102017

Salvochea wrote:
why is this bad? Is it wrong to have a national industry? The point is to have later strong unions to be able to control these new industries.

'Strong unions' didn't arise from nationalisation, nationalisation was a response to strong unions (and/or the existential threat of 'communism'). If you just conflate nationalised industry with workers organisation it's mixing up correlation and causation.

Could also look at autogestation in Algeria, where nationalisation was taken as a measure to neutralise/co-opt working class expropriations of plantations and factories.

Red Marriott's picture
Red Marriott
Offline
Joined: 7-05-06
Jun 1 2018 21:28
Savolchea wrote:
Thatcher did a good job in anarchists supporting neoliberalism! We defend expropriations and self-management, but it is to be noted that it's far more easy to organize in the public sector than in private companies.

Learn some history; Thatcher's greatest single victory in the class struggle - which paved the way for most others - was in defeating the 1984-85 miners strike in what was a fully nationalised industry.

Mike Harman
Offline
Joined: 7-02-06
Jun 1 2018 21:42

Also in the '60s the Labour government under Harold Wilson closed a lot of mines and laid off a lot of workers from what was a nationalised industry then too. The actual number of job losses was similar, but it was 43% of mining jobs lost in the '60s, compared to 80% in the '80s, and there was very low unemployment in the '60s meaning it was easy for laid of miners to find other work, so apart from a wildcat strike in '69, no resistance to this compared to the '80s.

A lot of the Beeching closures (hundreds of miles of railways) were also under Labour in the same period, rail was nationalised then too.

Then in the '70s, British Leyland was nationalised, there was wage stagnation, lay-offs and then it closed:

https://libcom.org/history/red-rose-nissan-john-holloway
https://libcom.org/library/an-interview-with-tony-mcqade-former-shop-ste...