Can individual capitalists obstruct the state's duty to act as the executive committee of the bourgeoisie?

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Agent of the International's picture
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Sep 1 2013 18:23
Can individual capitalists obstruct the state's duty to act as the executive committee of the bourgeoisie?
ICC, http://en.internationalism.org/icconline/201307/8973/nsa-spying-scandal-... wrote:
But does all this mean that the US democratic state is a pure “illusion,” that power lies somewhere other than the visible structures of the state? Perhaps with the intelligence agencies or some other “deep structure”[7] that remains hidden in the shadows? The answer to this has to be: yes and no. It is true that the development of state capitalism has produced alternate centers of power that are outside the constitutional structures of the state. These have been known for some time: the military industrial complex, powerful industrial lobby groups, the homeland security/intelligence apparatus, Halliburton, the Cargill Group, etc. Moreover, it is true that these various loci of power can, at times, exert a strong enough influence over the formal structures of the state to the point where it can be accurate to say that they have “captured” some part of it and are molding for their own particular interests. This has been a major problem for US state capitalism as of late in its tendency to obstruct the state from operating in the overall interests of the national capital rather than various particular factions of it.

Is the latter part of this quote any accurate? How far can particular interests, in terms of influence, gain over the state? I'm sure no individual or subset of capitals is able to supersede the interest of the national capital as a whole. They may be able to gain a legislation here or there that favors them, but I'm sure they can't go much farther to obstruct the overall course the state chooses to take.

It also reminds me of liberals who make the equations that economic power equals political power ("money is power"). When powerful capitalists like the Koch brothers, Mosanto, etc, send lobbyists to Washington or flood money to the electoral system, isn't their influence limited, i.e. they can only make changes that are minor, but not big enough to change the shape and course of the economy? Has it ever happened? "Military-industrial complex"?

I think its always the case that the state will serve the collective interests of the bourgeoisie, regardless of whether or not its being influenced by this or that particular interest.

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Sep 1 2013 18:27

This also reminds of when some politicos said the War on Terror wasn't about oil (access or control) because the oil companies didn't influence (e.g. through lobbying) the state.