Acpo chief, you're one low-expectation-having motherf*cker.

A quote piece by the Times from Sir Ken Jones, head of the Association of Chief Police Officers reminded me of Chris Rock's most famous, and funny skit.

Sir Ken was responding to a lightweight rebuke over protest policing tactics from the under-fire "Independent" Police Complaints Commission when he remarked: "I saw some of the footage last week of whole groups of officers being hemmed in. Nobody wants to talk about that now. Those officers behaved really well, they acted with restraint.”

To paraphrase Chris Rock's comment from way back in 1996:

You know the worst thing about cops? Cops always want credit for some shit they supposed to do. A cop will brag about some shit a normal man just does. A cop will say some shit like, "they acted with restraint."

You're supposed to, you dumb motherfucker! What kind of ignorant shit is that? "I can't find any other country that doesn't use water cannon, CS gas, rubber bullets." What do you want, a cookie?! You're not supposed to, you low-expectation-having motherfucker!

Posted By

Rob Ray
Apr 20 2009 10:29

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Entdinglichung
Apr 20 2009 12:16
jef costello
Apr 21 2009 18:22

That's quite a limp-wristed mosh pit.

Farce
Apr 22 2009 09:28

You call that a limp-wristed mosh pit? This is what I call a limp-wristed mosh pit. laugh out loud

slothjabber
Apr 22 2009 11:12

I thought Jeff was referring to the bit of video of the G20 demos where the cops were 'hemmed in but acted with restraint'. But, I guess not...

DER SYNDIKALIST
May 7 2009 13:36

No Pasaran.

nicoduca
Jun 2 2009 18:03

Sir Ken Jones, the out-going president of the Association of Chief Police Officers, has been appointed deputy commissioner of police in Victoria, the Australian state notorious for underworld crime and corruption

Sir Ken, a former Chief Constable of Sussex police with 37 years of policing, has been put in charge of the state's crime unit, a job until recently held by his new boss, police commissioner Simon Overland.

The position put Mr Overland on the front line during Melbourne's gangland wars, which lasted from 1998 - 2006.

He is the second Briton to be appointed to a senior police post in Australia - the first was Peter Ryan, former NSW police chief charged wtih ending corruption in the NSW police force between 1996 - 2001.

Sir Ken was originally considered for the Chief Commissioner's job but missed out to Mr Overland.

His experience as a former corruption investigator in Hong Kong will inevitably mean he will be seen as part of an anti-corruption drive instigated by Mr Overland and his predecessor, former police commissioner Christine Nixon.

Accusations of corruption and links with organised crime have cast a long shadow over the reputation of Victoria police in recent years.

Mr Overland and Ms Nixon led a purge of old school police officers, and a series of internal investigations exposed links between serving police officers and the gangland wars in which 27 members of the underworld were murdered.

During the investigations, the drugs squad was revealed as corrupt, a culture of beating up prisoners in the armed offenders squad was exposed and three senior officers were found to have leaked details of an underworld murder investigation.

The appointment of Sir Ken, an outsider, might be interpreted as a sign that Mr Overland is still concerned about corruption in his police force.

That concern appeared to be born out today after a veteran police officer was charged for perverting the course of justice and disclosing confidential information. The middle aged sergeant from a Melbourne police station is alleged to have become embroiled with a drug trafficking gang investigated by the Purana taskforce, whose main role is to investigate organised crime.

Sir Ken was unavailable to speak to The Times but told The Australian newspaper his experience in tackling corruption in Hong Kong in the 1980s probably helped get him the job.

He saw himself as a "progressive" policeman and wanted to make fighting organised crime a priority, he said.

Greg Davies, Victoria Police Assocation secretary, gave Sir Ken a cautious welcome but warned that he was taking on a difficult portfolio, with a department that was still reeling from a series of changes put in place by Mr Overland.

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